The Anti-Jacobin Review and Magazine, Issues 99-102

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J. Whittle, 1807 - English literature
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Page 349 - The condition of Man after the fall of Adam is such, that he cannot turn and prepare himself, by his own natural strength and good works, to faith, and calling upon God. Wherefore we have no power to do good works pleasant and acceptable to God, without the grace of God by Christ preventing us, that we may have a good will, and working with us, when we have that good will.
Page 247 - Christ raised; and if Christ be not raised, your faith is vain; ye are yet in your sins.
Page 352 - We are accounted righteous before God, only for the merit of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ by faith, and not for our own works or deservings...
Page 57 - And though the rocky-crested summits frown, These rocks, by custom, turn to beds of down. From art more various are the blessings sent, Wealth, commerce, honour, liberty, content ; Yet these each other's power so strong contest, That either seems destructive of the rest.
Page 246 - Christianity, which commences in the promise, that ' the seed of the woman should bruise the head of the serpent.
Page 292 - Then kneeling down to heaven's eternal King, The saint, the father, and the husband prays : Hope " springs exulting on triumphant wing,"* That thus they all shall meet in future days ; There ever bask in uncreated rays, No more to sigh or shed the bitter tear, Together hymning their Creator's praise, In such society, yet still more dear ; While circling time moves round in an eternal sphere.
Page 415 - When I say unto the wicked, thou shalt surely die; and thou givest him not warning, nor speakest to warn the wicked from his wicked way, to save his life; the same wicked man shall die in his iniquity, but his blood will I require at thine hand.
Page 433 - Q. HORATII FLACCI EPISTOLARUM LIBER SECUNDUS. EPISTOLA I. QUUM tot sustineas et tanta negotia solus, Res ítalas armis tuteris, moribus ornes, Legibus emendes ; in publica commoda peccem, Si longo sermone morer tua tempora, Caesar.
Page 46 - That the influence of the Crown had increased, was increasing, and ought to be diminished:
Page 31 - To civilize the rude unpolish'd world, And lay it under the restraint of laws; To make man mild, and sociable to man ; To cultivate the wild licentious savage With wisdom, discipline, and liberal arts; Th...

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