London Labour and the London Poor: A Cyclopędia of the Condition and Earnings of Those That Will Work, Those That Cannot Work, and Those That Will Not

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Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2009 - Social Science - 536 pages
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Assembled from a series of newspaper articles first published in the newspaper *Morning Chronicle* throughout the 1840s, this exhaustively researched, richly detailed survey of the teeming street denizens of London is a work both of groundbreaking sociology and salacious voyeurism. In an 1850 review of the survey, just prior to its initial book publication, William Makepeace Thackeray called it "tale of terror and wonder" offering "a picture of human life so wonderful, so awful, so piteous and pathetic, so exciting and terrible, that readers of romances own they never read anything like to it." Delving into the world of the London "street-folk"-the buyers and sellers of goods, performers, artisans, laborers and others-this extraordinary work inspired the socially conscious fiction of Charles Dickens in the 19th century as well as the urban fantasy of Neil Gaiman in the late 20th. Volume I explores the lives of: the "wandering tribes" costermongers sellers of fish, fruits and vegetables sellers of books and stationery sellers of manufactured goods women and children on the streets and more. English journalist HENRY MAYHEW (1812-1887) was a founder and editor of the satirical magazine *Punch.*
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - clfisha - LibraryThing

The journalist Henry Mayhew started writing articles on London's poor in 1849, interviewing people so they could tell their own story. Over the years by adding vivid descriptions, statistics, essays ... Read full review

London labour and the London poor

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Journalist Mayhew wrote these texts as newspaper articles between 1849 and 1850. He exposed the underbelly of London's impoverished masses, some working, some begging, others stealing. Dickens, it ain't. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
2
III
3
IV
4
V
61
VI
79
VII
96
VIII
104
X
130
XI
145
XII
158
XIII
213
XIV
323
XV
457
XVI
468
Copyright

IX
120

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