The History of King Philip's War ; Also of Expeditions Against the French and Indians in the Eastern Parts of New-England, in the Years 1689, 1690, 1692, 1696 and 1704. With Some Account of the Divine Providence Towards Col. Benjamin Church

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Howe & Norton, printers, 1825 - America - 304 pages
 

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Contents

I
15
II
121
III
131
IV
144
V
173
VI
182
VII
207

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Page 269 - Faith, etc., having undertaken, for the glory of God and advancement of the Christian faith, and honor of our King and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia, do by these presents solemnly and mutually, in the presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic...
Page 269 - Politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the Colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
Page 269 - God and one another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic, for our better ordering and preservation, and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof do enact, constitute, and frame such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the colony ; unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
Page 302 - Ask where's the North ? at York, 'tis on the Tweed ; In Scotland, at the Orcades ; and there, At Greenland, Zembla, or the Lord knows where.
Page 175 - Philip and Mary, by the grace of God, king and queen of England, France, Naples, Jerusalem, and Ireland, defenders of the faith...
Page 215 - States, or any other your superior Officer, according to the Rules and Discipline of War, in Pursuance of the Trust reposed in you.
Page 98 - Told him also that his custom in the like cases was to creep with his company on their bellies until they came as near as they could; and that as soon as the Enemy discovered them they would cry out; and that was the word for his Men to fire and fall on.
Page 100 - So some of Captain Church's Indians took hold of him by his stockings, and some by his small breeches, being otherwise naked, and drew him through the mud to the upland; and a doleful, great, naked, dirty beast he looked like. Captain Church then said, forasmuch as he had caused many an Englishman's body to be unburied, and to rot above ground, that not one of his bones should be buried.
Page 71 - ... in the other, danced round the fire, and began to fight with it, making mention of all the several Nations and Companies of Indians in the Country that were Enemies to the English; and at naming of every particular Tribe of Indians, he would draw out and fight a new firebrand. And at his finishing his fight with each particular firebrand, would bow to him and thank him...

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