The History and Practice of the Art of Photography, Or, The Production of Pictures Through the Agency of Light: Containing All the Instructions Necessary for the Complete Practice of the Daguerrean and Photogenic Art, Both on Metalic Plates and on Paper

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G.P. Putnam, 1849 - Calotype - 144 pages
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Contents

I
3
II
14
III
29
IV
39
V
43
VI
61
VII
81
VIII
87
IX
97
X
109
XI
123
XII
129
XIII
135

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Page 118 - I have procured, have been on paper previously washed with certain preparations of uric acid, which is a very remarkable and powerful photographic element. The intensity of the original negative picture is no criterion of what may be expected in the positive. It is from the production, by one and the same action of the light, of either a positive or a negative picture, according to the subsequent manipulations, that I have designated the process thus generally sketched out, by the term Amphitype,...
Page 114 - The paper should be moistened at the back by sponging and blotting off. It should then be pinned on a board, the moist side downwards, so that two of its edges (suppose the right-hand and lower ones) shall project a little beyond those of the board. The board being then inclined twenty or thirty degrees to the horizon, the alcoholic tincture (mixed with a very little water...
Page 118 - If, then, the process have been successful, a perfectly black positive picture is at once developed. At first it most commonly happens that the whole picture is sooty or dingy to such a degree that it is condemned as spoiled, but on keeping it between the leaves of a book, especially in a moist atmosphere, by extremely slow degrees this dinginess disappears, and the picture disengages itself with continually increasing sharpness and clearness, and acquires the exact effect of a copper-plate engraving...
Page 114 - It should then be pinned on a board, the moist side downwards, so that two of its edges (suppose the right-hand and lower ones) shall project a little beyond those of the board. The board being then inclined twenty or thirty degrees to the horizon, the alcoholic tincture (mixed with a very little water, if the petals themselves be not very juicy) is to be applied with a brush in strokes from left to right, taking care not to go over the edges which rest on the board, but to pass clearly over those...
Page 118 - ... a term which is often marked by the appearance of a feeble positive picture of a bright yellow hue on the pale yellow ground of the paper. A long time (several weeks) is often required for this, but heat accelerates the action, and it is often complete in a few hours. In this state the picture is to be very thoroughly rinsed and soaked in pure warm water, and then dried. It is then to be well ironed with a smooth iron, heated so as barely not to injure the paper, placing it, for better security...
Page 117 - Paper so prepared and dried takes a negative picture, in a time varying from half an hour to five or six hours, according to the intensity of the light'; and the impression produced varies in apparent force from a faint and hardly perceptible picture, to one of the highest conceivable fullness and richness both of tint and detail, the colour in this case being a superb velvety brown.
Page 102 - ... it. But these pictures possess the beautiful and extraordinary property of being susceptible of revival. In order to revive them and restore their original appearance, it is only necessary to wash them again by candlelight with gallo-nitrate of silver, and warm them : this causes all the shades of the picture to darken greatly, while the white parts remain unaffected.
Page 101 - ... the paper. When the paper is quite blank, as is generally the case, it is a highly curious and beautiful phenomenon to see the spontaneous commencement of the picture, first tracing out the stronger outlines, and then gradually filling up all the numerous and complicated details.
Page 58 - A plate of amalgamated zinc, D, varying with the fancy of the operator from one half to the entire width of the silver is placed on each side of the wood. This is set into a glass vessel...
Page 4 - ... of silver. Keep this liquor in a glass decanter well stopped. Then cut out from a paper the letters you would have appear, and paste the paper on the decanter, which you are to place in the sun, in such a manner that its rays may pass through the spaces cut out of the paper, and fall on the surface of the liquor. The part of the glass through which the rays pass will turn black, and that under the paper will remain white. You must observe not to move the bottle during the time of the operation.

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