General History of the Christian Religion and Church, Volume 4

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Contents

Unsought agreement of the latter with the Nicene creed
54
Athanasius returns among the Egyptian monks 5657 Manifestation of differences among the AntiNicene party after
57
Antioch where Eudoxius was bishop principal seat of
63
tures teach the term w must be discarded 67 By various arts they contrive to impose this creed on
69
JUtletian Schism at Antioch
73
Entrance of Theodosius into Constantinople who removes
80
Resigns his post Influence of Gregory of Nyssa on the farther
83
Language of Theodore and Theodoret opposed to the creation
90
neither the divine nor human nature meets with its just
93
His idea of the Godman
99
in the schools of Antioch and of Alexandria Distinctive character of these schools 107
107
Maintains the union of two natures in Christ in opposition
115
The two tendencies compared Their fundamental difference 121122
121
presbyter Anastatius also of another ecclesiastic against the term mother of God SsoTo 123127
123
Nestorius attacked in a sermon by Proclus defends himself
129
The scheme of Apollinaris condemned by Western councils
133
Defends himself against the charge of a contentious spirit
136
His two works against Nestorius addressed to the emperor
142
Cyrill supported by Rome grants an arrogant pardon to Nes
148
Candidian imperial agent appointed with full powers to pre
153
Letter of Nestorius and ten other bishops to the emperor
160
The Comes John appointed the emperors commissioner to
168
bishoprics The emperor still hopes for the restoration
171
Proclus appointed patriarch on the death of Maximian in 433
182
Remains four years in a cloister near Antioch a d 435
188
that there is but
195
Theodoret arraigned by Dioscurus before Domnus of Antioch
202
Page
207
Eutyches deposed and excommunicated
208
Course taken by Leo the Great with regard to the Robbers Synod
218
Order for a general council to meet at Nice Leos delegates
223
Dioscurus deposed
229
Zeno again emperor Favourable to the Chalcedonian party
235
Constantinople in consequence of the addition to
239
The council under Mennas a d 536 fully condemns Mono
246
Tlie controversy on the three chapters
255
Vigilius excommunicated by a Western synodal decision
261
Heros of Aries and Lazarus of Aix enter a complaint against
316
The decided protest of a synod at Carthage produces an
323
Africans secure on their side the civil power Imperial edicts
324
The Pelagian anthropology rigidly carried out must needs
331
Fundamental difference According to the professions of
338
Accordingly the fundamental difference is in the different
344
yet that there were examples of perfect holiness 346353 The wavering notion of grace among the Pelagians
354
The Pelagians recognising the objective significance of justi
362
Augustins prevenient efficacious and cooperating grace
369
Augustins prudent logically skilful statement of this doctrine
373
The SemiPelayians in Gaul not satisfied with Augustins
379
The worldlyminded Ithacius gains over Maximus the usurper
384
Prosper and Hilary have recourse to Coelestin of Rome Coe
385
system of doctrine His dialectic method 391399
391
The author of the Predestinatus a SemiPelagian By pre
397
Development of the doctrine concerning man previous to
400
Csesarius of Aries a man distinguished for practical activity
405
man the image of God for the whole crea
411
Chrysostom His practical spirit His quiet development
417
Isidore of Pelusium Seeds of goodness left even after the fall
423
Nestorius patriarch of Constantinople subsequent to the year
428
Theodore of Mopsuestia For adults the forgiveness of
430
Orders for a general council to meet at Ephesus in
431
Doctrine of the Lords Supper
435
Eusebius of Caesarea seems like Origen to distinguish the sen
442
The monks especially in Egypt in part for and in part against
449
Eufinus and John of Jerusalem united with Jerome also
456
Theophilus of Alexandria Connected with Origenistic monks
462
Arrival of the monks Letter of Chrysostom to Theophilus
469
the gospel in his exile Innocent of Rome intercedes
473
Spirit of Christian love shown at the council of Alexandria
478
Synesius despite his views in part Origenistic differing from
479
Onesided ethical tendencies Ehetorius and the knowledge
485
Martin of Tours intercedes with the emperor whom Mag
493
Epiphanius of Palestine Educated among the Egyptian
509
Nestorians in Persia
510

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Page 14 - God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him might not perish, but have everlasting life.
Page 423 - For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from their mother's womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven's sake. He that is able to receive it, let him receive it.
Page 362 - He spared not His own Son, but gave Him up for us all," for His enemies who hated Him.
Page 373 - Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling;" and why? " for it is God that worketh in us to will and to do according to his good pleasure.
Page 394 - God leads all men to the kriowledge of himself; and thereby he reveals his will, that all men should come to the knowledge of the truth and be saved.
Page 31 - Homo-ousion dependedi in his view, the whole unity of the Christian consciousness of God, the completeness of the revelation of God in Christ, the reality of the redemption which Christ wrought, and of the communion with God restored by him to man.
Page 350 - ... it unfolded itself. And this theory would easily blend with Augustine's speculative form of thought, as he had appropriated to himself the Platonico- Aristotelian realism, in the doctrine of general conceptions, and conceived of general conceptions as the original types of the kind realized in individual things...
Page 88 - S. non de patre procedit in filium, ęt de filio procedit ad sanctificandam creaturam, sed simul de utroque procedit. quamvis hoc filio Pater dederit, ut quemadmodum de se, ita de illo quoque procedat.
Page 77 - Basil replied that he had nothing to be afraid of : possessions, of which men might deprive him, he had none, except his few books, and his cloak. An exile was no exile for him, since he knew that the whole earth is the Lord's. If torture was threatened, his feeble body would yield to the first blows, and death would bring him nearer to his God, after whom he longed. Valens himself was constrained to show respect for Basil. Many times he was on the point of condemning him to exile,3 but he did not...
Page 228 - Upon this the commissioners suggested, that nothing more was needed than to receive into the creed that article from the letter of Leo. After this proposal had been generally received, they held with the select committee a secret meeting, in which the new symbol of faith was drawn up accordingly. In this it was defined that the one Christ, Son, Lord, only-begotten, should be recognized in two i Leo was asked, in a letter addressed to concil.

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