Alexander & Co.'s Hub Coin Book: An Encyclopędia of Rare Coins

Front Cover
Alexander & Company, 1910 - Coins - 146 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - Treasury notes shall be a legal tender in payment of all debts, public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the contract, and shall be receivable for customs, taxes, and all public dues, and when so received may be reissued.
Page 10 - Gold certificates, silver certificates and national bank notes are not legal tender, but both classes of certificates are receivable for all public dues, while national bank notes are receivable for all public dues except duties on imports, and may be paid out by the government for all salaries and other debts and demands owing by the United States to Individuals, corporations and associations within the United States, except Interest on the public debt and in redemption of the national currency.
Page 9 - ... legal tender in proportion to its weight. Standard silver dollars are legal tender at their nominal or face value In payment of all debts, oublic and private, without regard to the amount, except where otherwise expressly stipulated In the contract. Subsidiary silver Is legal tender for amounts not exceeding $10 in any one payment.
Page 9 - There are ten different kinds of money in circulation in the United States, namely: Gold coins, standard silver dollars, subsidiary silver, gold certificates, silver certificates, Treasury notes issued...
Page 9 - ... limit of tolerance prescribed TIy law; and when below such standard of tolerance it is legal tender in proportion to its weight. Standard silver dollars are legal tender at their nominal or face value in payment of all debts , public and private...
Page 66 - Following the suspension of specie payments in 1862, subsidiary silver coins largely disappeared from circulation. Their place for a time was supplied by the use of tickets, due bills, and other forms of private obligations, which were issued by merchants, manufacturers, and others whose business required them to "make change." Congress authorized, first, the use of postage stamps for change; second a modified form of postage stamp called postal currency; and, finally, fractional paper currency in...
Page 11 - The coinage of the standard silver dollar was discontinued by the act of February 12, 1873, and it was restored by the act of February 28, 1878. The total amount coined from 1792 to 1873 was $8,031,238, and the amount coined from 1878 to June 30, 1896, was $430,790,041.
Page 10 - National bank notes are receivable for all public dues except duties on imports, and may be paid out by the Government for all salaries and other debts and demands owing by the United States to individuals, corporations and associations within the United States, except Interest on the public debt, and in redemption of the National currency. All National banks are required by law to receive the notes of other National banks at par. The minor coins of nickel and copper are legal tender to the extent...
Page 10 - The amount of fine gold in the dollar is 23.122 grains, and the remainder of the weight is an alloy of copper. While the gold dollar is the unit and standard of value, the actual coinage of the $1 piece was discontinued under authority of the act of September 26, 1890. Gold is now coined in denominations of $2.50, $5, $10, and $20, called respectively quarter eagles, half eagles, eagles, and double eagles. The total coinage of gold by the mints of the United States from 1792 to June 30...
Page 66 - When specie payments were suspended, about January 1, 1862, both gold and silver coins disappeared from circulation. The place of the subsidiary silver coins was for a time supplied by the use of tickets, duebills, and other forms of private obligations, which were issued by merchants, manufacturers, and others whose business required them to "make change.

Bibliographic information