Networks and Netwars: The Future of Terror, Crime, and Militancy

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Rand Corporation, Nov 5, 2001 - Political Science - 380 pages
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Netwar-like cyberwar-describes a new spectrum of conflict that is emerging in the wake of the information revolution. Netwar includes conflicts waged, on the one hand, by terrorists, criminals, gangs, and ethnic extremists; and by civil-society activists (such as cyber activists or WTO protestors) on the other. What distinguishes netwar is the networked organizational structure of its practitioners-with many groups actually being leaderless-and their quickness in coming together in swarming attacks. To confront this new type of conflict, it is crucial for governments, military, and law enforcement to begin networking themselves.
 

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Contents

Chapter One THE ADVENT OF NETWAR REVISITED
1
Part I VIOLENCEPRONE NETWARS
27
Chapter Two THE NETWORKING OF TERROR IN THE INFORMATION AGE
29
Chapter Three TRANSNATIONAL CRIMINAL NETWORKS1
61
Chapter Four GANGS HOOLIGANS AND ANARCHISTSTHE VANGUARD OF NETWAR IN THE STREETS1
99
Part II SOCIAL NETWARS
127
CYBER ACTIVISTS USE THE INTERNET TO PROMOTE DEMOCRACY IN BURMA
129
Chapter Six EMERGENCE AND INFLUENCE OF THE ZAPATISTA SOCIAL NETWAR
171
Part III ONCE AND FUTURE NETWARS
237
THE INTERNET AS A TOOL FOR INFLUENCING FOREIGN POLICY
239
ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVISM AND ITS OPPONENTS
289
Chapter Ten WHAT NEXT FOR NETWORKS AND NETWARS?
311
THE SHARPENING FIGHT FOR THE FUTURE1
363
CONTRIBUTORS
373
ABOUT THE EDITORS
375
Copyright

WTO PROTEST STRATEGY AND TACTICS
201

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About the author (2001)

John Arquilla (Ph.D., Political Science, Stanford University) is a RAND consultant and a professor of foreign policy at the United States Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California.

David F. Ronfeldt (Ph.D., Political Science, Stanford University) is a senior social scientist at RAND whose research focus includes information revolution, netwar, cyberocracy, strategic swarming and the rise of transnational networks of nongovernmenta

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