A Biological Reconnaissance of the Base of the Alaska Peninsula, Issues 24-26

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1904 - Animals - 86 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 43 - Hunting these squirrels and digging them out seems to be a combination of business and pleasure for the bears, and the antics they go through are very interesting to the onlooker. The bear is usually so intent on the game that he himself is easily approached. Sometimes he slips along a hillside and tries to catch the squirrel by a sudden pounce, but this usually fails. When the squirrel dodges into its near-by burrow, new tactics are adopted. The bear immediately begins to dig, throwing out big turfs...
Page 54 - I have followed one of these preoccupied little animals for half an hour, often within 20 or 30 feet, moving only when it was rustling in the leaves, and watching its motions without being discovered or creating alarm. Hunters say that if you stand still the armadillos will sometimes bump against your feet without discovering you, so short sighted are they and so intent on their own business. But when alarmed, they get over the ground with a rush that is surprisingly rapid considering their turtle-like...
Page 44 - ... this little brown snake at Barnard Creek, west of Columbia. March 4, 1892, and Gaut collected one at Sour Lake, March 14. 1905. Eutainia elegans marciana (B. & G.). Garter Snake. There are specimens of this plain little striped snake from Brownsville. Santa Rosa Ranch (Cameron County), Corpus Christi, Victoria, Seguin. Sycamore Creek, Devils River, Paisano, and Boquillas. It is the common garter snake of the whole arid Lower Sonoran zone of western Texas, apparently reaching its eastern limit...
Page 228 - Mr. Gerrit S. Miller, jr., of the US National Museum; and Dr. DG Elliot, of the Field Columbian Museum.
Page 65 - Thousands of deer and antelope were scattered over it. Never before had we seen such numbers. Droves of mustangs also appeared. The deer and antelope were usually grazing in herds of from ten to fifty, and as we approached they leisurely trotted off to a short distance and again stopped. We shot none, for I was desirous of reaching Corpus Christi before night.
Page 61 - ... entire region is due to the practical, business-like methods of the large ranch owners, who control the hunting on their ranges, and would as soon think of depleting their herds of cattle as the game under their control. On some of the larger ranches mounted rangers are regularly employed to ride over the country and protect both stock and game, and to see that fences are kept up and that there is no hunting. But usually this is an important part of the business of the regular cowboys. As a practical...
Page 58 - Elk. There are no wild elk to-day in the State of Texas, but years ago, as several old ranchmen have told me, they ranged south to the southern part of the Guadalupe Mountains, across the Texas line. I could not get an actual record of one killed in Texas, or nearer than 6 or 8 miles north of the line, but as they were common to within a few years in the Sacramento Mountains, only 75 miles farther north, I am inclined to credit the rather indefinite reports of their former occurrence in this part...
Page 82 - Black-backed Rock Squirrel. This, the handsomest of the rock squirrels, with glossy black head and shoulders, inhabits a restricted area in the rough and semiarid mesquite country along the eastern slope of the southern arm of the Staked Plains, from Mason and Llano to a little west of Austin and San Antonio, and again west to Kerrville and the head of the Nueces River.
Page 42 - They follow the mother until the end of their second summer, when they are often nearly as large as she is. Although numbers of the adults frequent some localities, it is generally safe to assume that three or four bears found together constitute one family. ' The cubs are mischievous and playful and receive many a stern reproving cuff from their mother. The brown bears avail themselves of everything the country affords in the way of food, including fish, flesh, fruit, roots, and grass, a variety...
Page 206 - Gaut, March 29, 1893, indicate that it is a summer resident along the Rio Grande. Lloyd's specimens were " found in a cave tunnel," and Gaut's were taken in Pump Canyon, a deep box canyon near Langtry. I collected three adult males of this bat at Marble Cave, Mo., on June 28 and 30, 1892. One was caught in the cave 150 feet below the surface of the earth ; the others were shot as they came out of the mouth of the cave in the evening. If this bat is habitually a cave dweller, the distribution of caves...

Bibliographic information