The Albigenses, by the author of 'Bertram'.

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1824
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Page 15 - Mihi est propositum in taberna mori ; Vinum sit appositum morientis ori : Ut dicant, cum venerint, angelorum chori, Deus sit propitius huic potatori.
Page 100 - ... into a slumber, and dreamed that he had been contending with a whole army of harnessed knights in the cause of the lady Isabelle, and overcame them. His vision went on, and he imagined that after saving the lady against all odds, he bore her to a wild wood, where a wolf with a human voice commanded him to strike a dagger into her throat. He obeyed as under a supernatural impulse ; but the moment he aimed his dagger at his lady's throat, the wolf fastened on his with fang and claw. He awoke in...
Page 19 - Pharamond, Clelia, Grand Cyrus, and other books of that stamp, which, with the Adventures of the Twelve Peers of France, and the Knights of the Round Table, constituted the chief part of her library. In these volumes, she conceived, were to be found all the treasures of the most sublime and useful knowledge, and therefore thought she could no way better instruct her young pupil, than by endeavouring to inspire him with those ideas, and with that taste...
Page 5 - em utterly now ? could you do that ? Hec. No, time must do't: we cannot disjoin wedlock; 'Tis of heaven's fastening. Well may we raise jars. Jealousies, strifes, and heart-burning disagreements, Like a thick scurf o'er life, as did our master Upon that patient miracle ; f but the work itself Our power cannot disjoint.
Page 209 - ... hands like mine. Under the old tyrants of the earth the decree of a senate might desolate a province, and the frolic of an emperor consume a city; but when did it chain up the arm of man, or wither his soul within him, like a papal interdict, at whose reported sound the bridegroom drops the hand of the betrothed, the mourner quits the unburied corse, and the priest flies from the altar?
Page 115 - Isabelle sprang on her feet — both hands were compressed on her left bosom, as if expecting her heart would burst, and her eyes inflamed and dilated seemed starting from their sockets. She directed them right onward for some moments, as if they could have pierced her prison-walls ; at length she turned them full on the outlaw, and that look said as audibly as language, "Begone this moment, or stay and see me driven to frenzy...
Page 65 - ... at first recoiled, and then by the sudden and strongly-marked change in his countenance, appeared to regard his companions with horror, as the most wicked wretches on earth. He slunk back to his bed of leaves, eyeing them with a most sinister expression, in which, however, there was something honest as well as truculent ; scarcely hushed his growling, ferocious dog ; and as the first light of dawn gleamed through the crevice, he unbarred his door, and silently motioned his guests to depart.
Page 113 - ... heard the sound of trumpets blown at a short distance, and announcing some distinguished approach. The Bishop of Toulouse instantly recognised the trumpets of the Count de Montfort ; for in those days, as it is said, every one of high distinction had a blast or note sounded peculiar to themselves, and which was well known to hearers even at a remote distance.
Page 102 - OUR battle will be told with greater clearness, if the reader is furnished with an outline of its order. As has been more than once intimated already, Sir Frederick Dashwood had made all his preparations to commence the assault from the side of the land, the object being to prevent a retreat...
Page 123 - Till thro' his en'my's heart his steel Had forc'da mortal wound. Graham like a tree with wind o'erthrown, Fell breathless on the clay, And down beside him sunk the Ross, And faint and dying lay. The sad Matilda saw him fall...

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