Fearsome Creatures of the Lumberwoods,: With a Few Desert and Mountain Beasts,

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Press of Judd & Detweiler, Incorporated, 1910 - Animals - 47 pages
 

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A century after its publication it is impossible to state for certain whether this book was written as a serious field manual to mysterious creatures rumored to haunt the woodlands of America, as an effort to record and preserve the tall tales told by loggers and lumber jacks, or whether it was simply written with tongue firmly in cheek. The whimsical illustrations by Coert Du Bois perfectly complement Cox's imaginative descriprions. Aside from a single entry fraught with casual racism, this is a fun little book from a more innocent time.  

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Page 31 - Pennsylvania have ever heard of the quaint beast, which is said to be fairly common in the hemlock forests of that State. The squonk is of a very retiring disposition, generally traveling about at twilight and dusk. Because of its misfitting . skin, which is covered with warts and moles, it is always unhappy ; in fact it is said, by people who are best able to judge, to be the most morbid of beasts.
Page 27 - ... old-timers know of the beast and its queer habits. The cactus cat, as its name signifies, lives in the great cactus districts, and is particularly abundant between Prescott and Tucson. It has been reported, also, from the valley of the lower Yaqui, in Old Mexico, and the cholla-covered hills of Yucatan. The cactus cat has thorny hair, the thorns being especially long and rigid on its ears. Its tail is branched, and upon the forearms above its front feet are sharp, knifelike blades of bone. With...
Page 9 - University, 1969. vi -f 65 pp. Illustrations, notes. $3.50.) "In size the hugag may be compared to the moose, and in form it somewhat resembles that animal. Very noticeable, however, are its jointless legs, which compel the animal to remain on its feet, and its long upper lip, which prevents it from grazing. If it tried that method of feeding it would simply tramp its upper lip into the dirt .... It is reported to keep going all day long, browsing on twigs, flopping its lip around trees, and stripping...
Page 31 - ... retiring disposition, generally traveling about at twilight and dusk. Because of its misfitting . skin, which is covered with warts and moles, it is always unhappy ; in fact it is said, by people who are best able to judge, to be the most morbid of beasts. Hunters who are good at tracking are able to follow a squonk by its tear-stained trail, for the animal weeps constantly. When cornered and escape seems impossible, or when surprised and frightened, it may even dissolve itself in tears. Squonk...
Page 39 - It soon attains remarkable skill in this method of travel, which enables it to surprise burrowing grouse, crouching rabbits, and skulking varmints of many kinds.
Page 23 - ... section corner. From this fact he reasoned that the shagamaw must have been originally a very imitative animal, which, from watching purveyors, timber cruisers, and trappers patiently following lines through the woods, contracted the habit itself.

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