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Books Books 1 - 2 of 2 on Come hither, as thou farest, renowned Odysseus, great glory of the Achaeans; stay....
" Come hither, as thou farest, renowned Odysseus, great glory of the Achaeans; stay the ship that thou mayest listen to the voice of us two. For never yet has any man rowed past this isle in his black ship until he has heard the sweet voice from our lips.... "
Devices of the Soul: Battling for Our Selves in an Age of Machines - Page 8
by Steve Talbott - 2007 - 287 pages
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Poetics before Plato: Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories ...

Grace M. Ledbetter - Philosophy - 2009 - 144 pages
...divine power that the Sirens represent, and survive such a perilous encounter. The Sirens, who claim to know “all the toils that in wide Troy the Argives and Trojans endured,” 52 boast to Odysseus of their twofold effect on a human audience. When a man has heard their song,...
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ThamyrisVol.1 No.1

Nanny M. W. de Vries, Jan Best
...Odysseus, great glory of the Achaeans; stay the ship that thou mayest listen to the voice of us two. For never yet has any man rowed past this isle in his...that in wide Troy the Argives and Trojans endured for the will of the gods, and we know all things that come to pass on fruitful earth."1 Thus sing the...
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