A history of the colleges, halls, and public buildings attached to the University of Oxford

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Page 145 - Return, we beseech thee, O God of hosts: look down from heaven, and behold, and visit this vine; And the vineyard which thy right hand hath planted, and the branch that thou madest strong for thyself.
Page 205 - Going on to the right hand, on the other side of the gateway, are four figures, viz., the Schoolmaster, the Lawyer, the Physician, and the Divine. These are ranged along the outside of the library, and represent the duties and business of the students of the house. By means of learning in general, they are to be introduced to one of the three learned professions, or else, as is hinted to us by the figure with Cap and Bells in the corner, they must turn out Fools in the end.
Page 166 - Fidelium defunctorum de Oxon. The precise meaning of this may be understood from the obligation imposed on the society to pray for the good estate of Henry VI. and the archbishop during their lives, and for their souls after their decease ; also for the souls of Henry V. and the duke of Clarence, together with those of all the dukes, earls, barons, knights, esquires, and other subjects of the crown of England, who had fallen in the war with France; and for the souls of all the faithful deceased....
Page 117 - It was no less than to provide for the perpetual maintenance and instruction of two hundred scholars, to afford them a liberal support, and to lead them through...
Page xx - ... obtained the rudiments of education in a monastical establishment. In the year 1239, he appears to have been in possession of the family estate, and also of one inherited from his mother, both his parents being now dead. In 1259, he held a prebend in Exeter cathedral, and Browne Willis says, that he was vicar of Potton, in Bedfordshire, at the time of his promotion to the see of Rochester. Other accounts say, that he was first canon of Salisbury, and afterwards rector of Stratton. The custom...
Page 115 - ... in which there was frequently no mention of learning, declares that Wykeham was recommended to his holiness, " by the testimony of many persons worthy of credit, for his knowledge of letters, his probity of life and manners, and his prudence and circumspection in affairs both spiritual and temporal.
Page 63 - ... fell an early sacrifice to popular fury. In 1326 he was appointed guardian of the city of London during the king's absence in the west, and while he was taking measures to preserve the loyalty of the metropolis, the populace attacked him, Oct. 15, as he was walking the streets, and beheaded him near the north door of St. Paul's, together with sir Richard Stapledon, his brother. Godwin informs us that they buried the bishop in a heap of sand at the back of his house, without Temple-bar. Walsingham...
Page xix - MERTON (WALTER DE), the illustrious founder of Merton college, Oxford, which became the model of all other societies of that description, was bishop of Rochester and chancellor of England in the thirteenth century. Of. his personal history very little is known. From a pedigree of him, written about ten years after his death, we learn, that he was the son of William de Merton, archdeacon of Berks in 1224, 1231, and 1236, by Christina, daughter of Walter Fitz-Oliver, of Basingstoke. They were both...
Page 161 - Fox on the subject, there is reason to hope that his interference was more gentle than that of his predecessor Arundel. On the other hand, history has done ample justice to the spirit with which he resisted the assumed power of the pope in the disposition of ecclesiastical preferments, and asserted the privileges of the English church. Among the vindications of his character from the imputations thrown upon it by the agents of the pope, that of the university of Oxford is the most signal. They told...
Page 162 - University must not be omitted. They told the Pope, that " Chichele stood in the sanctuary " of God as a firm wall that heresy could not shake, " nor simony undermine; and that he was the darling " of the people, and the foster parent of the clergy.

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