Adventures of Don Quixote de la Mancha

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World Publishing House, 1875
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The adventures of Don Quixote de la Mancha

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Cervantes's masterpiece Don Quixote , Henry Fielding's favorite novel, was also much admired by Fielding's contemporary Smollett, who published a vigorous, highly readable translation in 1755 ... Read full review

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Page 170 - If, Sancho, thou observest these precepts, thy days will be long and thy fame eternal, thy recompense full, and thy felicity unspeakable. Thou shalt marry thy children to thy heart's content, and they and thy grandchildren shall want neither honors nor titles. Beloved by all men, thy days shall pass in peace and tranquillity ; and when the inevitable period comes, death shall steal on thee in a good and venerable old age, and thy grandchildren's children, with their tender and pious hands, shall...
Page 2 - His curiosity and extravagant fondness herein arrived at that pitch, that he sold many acres of arable land to purchase books of knight-errantry, and carried home all he could lay hands on of that kind ! C.
Page 184 - Now, because I have no witnesses of the loan, nor he of the pretended payment, I beseech your lordship to put him to his oath, and if he will swear he has paid me, I will freely forgive him before God and the world.
Page 311 - Dulcinea del Toboso is the most beautiful woman in the world, and I the most unfortunate knight on earth ; and it is not fit that my weakness should discredit this truth. Knight, push on your lance, and take away my life, since you have spoiled me of my honour.
Page 114 - Suppose them all carried over," said Don Quixote, "and do not be going and coming in this manner; or thou wilt not have finished carrying them over in a twelvemonth." "How many have passed already ?" said Sancho. "How the devil should I know?" answered Don Quixote. "See there now! did I not tell thee to keep an exact account 1 Before Heaven, there is an end of the story; I can go no farther.
Page 168 - The knowledge of thyself will preserve thee from vanity, and the fate of the frog that foolishly vied with the ox, will serve thee as a caution; the recollection, too, of having been formerly a swineherd in thine own country...

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