The True History of the American Revolution

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J.B. Lippincott, 1902 - United States - 437 pages
 

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Page 215 - No sea but what is vexed by their fisheries ; no climate that is not witness to their toils. Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise ever carried this most perilous mode of...
Page 61 - That his majesty's subjects in these colonies owe the same allegiance to the crown of Great Britain that is owing from his subjects born within the realm, and all due subordination to that august body, the Parliament of Great Britain.
Page 239 - That he *be hanged by the neck, and then cut down alive. 3. That his entrails be taken out, and burned, while he is yet alive. 4. That his head be cut off". 5. That his body be divided into four parts. 6. That his head and quarters be at the king's disposal (j) (20).
Page 175 - For my own part, there -was not a moment during the Revolution, when I would not have given every thing I possessed for a restoration to the State of things before the Contest began, provided we could have had any sufficient security for its continuance.
Page 129 - ... with the consent of the proprietary or chief governor, or assembly, or by act of parliament in England.
Page 149 - THE SACRED RIGHTS OF MANKIND ARE NOT TO BE RUMMAGED FOR AMONG OLD PARCHMENTS OR MUSTY RECORDS. THEY ARE WRITTEN, AS WITH A SUNBEAM, IN THE WHOLE VOLUME OF HUMAN NATURE, BY THE HAND OF THE DIVINITY ITSELF ; AND CAN NEVER BE ERASED OR OBSCURED BY MORTAL POWER.
Page 245 - Three of their most experienced generals are sent to wage war with their fellow-subjects : and America is amazed to find the name of Howe in the catalogue of her enemies : She loved his brother.
Page 170 - I think I can announce it as a fact, that it is not the wish or interest of that government, or any other upon this continent, separately or collectively, to set up for independence ; but this you may at the same time rely on, that none of them will ever submit to the loss of those valuable rights and privileges which are essential to the happiness of every free state, and without which, life...
Page 128 - The House was informed by the secretary of state, by order of His Majesty King James, that "America was not annexed to the realm, and that it was not fitting that Parliament should make laws for those countries.
Page 166 - Is this the object for which I have been contending? said I to myself, for I rode along without any answer to this wretch. Are these the sentiments of such people, and how many of them are there in the country? Half the nation, for what I know; for half the nation are debtors, if not more, and these have been in all countrieSj the sentiments of debtors.

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