Killing Cynthia Ann: A Novel

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TCU Press, 1999 - Fiction - 209 pages
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"Cynthia Ann never adapted to white culture. She was shunted from one Parker family to another, living in constant grief and doubt - about herself and her daughter and about the fate of her Comanche family still on the prairies. Convinced she was a captive of the Texans, Cynthia Ann was determined to escape to the high plains and the Comanche way. The Parkers neither cared for nor understood Cynthia Ann's obsession with returning to her homeland and her people."--BOOK JACKET. "Several novels have been written about Cynthia Ann's capture and her life with the tribe, but the decade that Cynthia Ann spent among her kin in the villages and countryside of North Texas has not been explored in fiction or serious historical study."--BOOK JACKET. "Charles Brashear's thoroughly researched and vividly realistic novel, Killing Cynthia Ann, tells the story as it might have happened."--BOOK JACKET.
 

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Killing Cynthia Ann: a novel

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This novel might more accurately be titled Killing N udah because when its central character is recaptured by Texas Rangers in 1860, having been abducted by Comanches 24 years earlier, she has long ... Read full review

Contents

On The Pease River 18 Dec 1860
1
At Camp Cooper
15
Lost in the Snow 127
27
Victory Dance at Birdville
41
Ceremonies 151
51
Austin
63
House of No Escape
75
The CowrieShell Dress
85
Peta Nocona At Fort Cobb
117
Run Away With Billy
121
Courting Coho Smith
125
Sunday School Spring 1863
133
A Parker Thanksgiving November 1863
149
HasNoName161
161
Shes Getting Better 169
169
GoesBlank 1179
179

Preloch The Queen
91
Fighting Amelia Winter 186199
99
Gathering At The River Summer 1862
105
With Serena and Billy Parker Fall 1862 111
111
Looking At Walls 1867
187
The Death of Cynthia Ann
193
Historical and Bibliographic Notes
201
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Brashear is a retired professor of creative writing.

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