Report of the Annual Meeting, Volume 76, Part 1906

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1907 - Science
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Contents

Notes on the PermoCarboniferous Coalfields of Australsua By Pro
3
Sfdnet Leetham and Wiluam Cramp 6
6
fThe Inspection and Examination of School By Profoaaor II E Arm
25
8 5hexatrien By Professor Van Ronrmaa
31
Report of the Conference of Delegates of Corresponding Societies held
47
Local Societies and Meteorology By Dr Hugh Robert Mill
53
Catalogue of the more important Papers published by the Corresponding
73
Magnetic Observations at Falmouth Observatory Report of the Committee
90
The Influence of Salt and other Solutions on the Itovdopment of the Frog
92
Experiments for improving the Construction of Practical Standards f
104
The Evolution of the Elements By F Soddt
122
Magnetic Survey of South Africa Preliminary Report of the Committee
131
Investigations of the Upper Atmosphere by Means of Kite in cooperation
138
On the Present Position of the Chemistry of the Gums By H H Robin
227
The Present Position of the Chemistry of Rubber By S S PicklesM Sc 233
233
The Study of HydroAromatic Substances Report of the Committee con
257
The Hydrolysis of Sugars By Robert J Caldwell B Sc
267
The Faunal Succession in the Carboniferous Limestone of the Southwest
292
Dynamic Isomerism Report of the Committee consisting of Professor H
293
Composition and Origin of the Crystalline Rocks of Anglesey Report of
301
Investigation of the Fossiliferous Drift Deposits at Kirmington Lincolnshire
313
Occupation of a Table at tbe Zoological Station nt Naples Report of
329
Accuracy and Comparability of British and Foreign Statistics of Inter
339
Anthropometric Investigations among the Native Troops of the Egyptian
347
The Age of Stone Circles Interim Report of the Committee consisting of
370
Anthropological Photographs Report of the Committee consisting of
383
Excavations on Roman Sites in Britain Report of the Committee consisting
400
Archaeological and Ethnological Researches in Crete Report of the Com
408
H St Gbobob Ghat
410
The Ductless Glands Second Interim Report of the Committee eornutimj
423
Peat Moss Deposits Interim Report of the Committee consisting of Iro
430
Studies most suitable for Elementary Schools Report of the Committee
438
Report of the SubCommittee on Arithmetic and Mensuration consisting
444
Report of the SubCommittee on Nature Study consisting of Mr R
459
Interim Report of SubCommittee on Domestic Work consisting of Miss
466
but Tcith a reference to the Journal or Setcpaper in hieh U u ymbhikrd in hWw
471
Discussion on the Evolution of the Elements Opened by F Soddt p 121
481
MONDAY AUGUST 6
483
Fossil Arthropods of the CoalFormation By Dr H Woodward F R S
567
On the Continuous Glacial Period By M B Cotbworth 673
573
Report on the Correlation and Age of South African Strata 7
579
Address by J J Lister M A F R S F Z S President of the Section
586
The Habits of Tubebuilding Worms By Arnold T Watson
599
The Birds and Mammals of Yorkshire By Oxley Grabham
605
Coast Erosion By Ci em ext Rbid F R S
621
The Chemical Aspects of Cvanogenesis in Hants By Professor Wtnomam
622
A New Form of Tacheometer or Range Finder By E A Reeves
627
Address by A L Bowlet M A President of the Section
629
FRIDAY AUGUST 3
643
The Distribution of Population by Facilities of Rapid Transit
649
Monthly Index Numbers of Prices for 190G By Clarence S Howells
655
WEDXESDA Y A UOUST 8
657
The New Engineering Laboratories Edinburgh University and their
668
WEDNESDAY AUGUST
674
Notes on the Ethnography of the BaYaka By T A Joyce M A
688
An AngloSaxon Cemetery in Ipswich By Miss Nika Frances
694
Earlv Traces of Human Typos in the Egean By Johx L Mtrbs M A
700
Address by Professor Francis Gotch M A D Sc F R S President of
704
Are the lreventive Measures which are Employed against Infectious
718
Address by Professor F W Olives D Sc F R S President of the Section
725
Interim Report on Research on South African Cycads p 431
739
Corn Smuts and their Propagation By Profeeaor T Joaaaoy DJie
743
Contributions to the Root Anatomv of theCupulifcne ami f th Mrliarr
749
The Present Position of the Chemistry of the Gums By II II Robinson
751
Fraine
759
Joint Discussion with Section D on Fertilisation
764
The Training of Primary Teachers By Professor J A Green B A
779
The Moral and Economic Standpoint of the Domestic Science Teacher
786
The Constructive Work of an Inspector of School By V Mathowc
795
APPENDIX
801
General Meetings exxiv
805
Joint Discussion with Section I Physiology on the Factors which determine
810
Melanism in Yorkshire Lepidoptera By G T Pobbitt F L S
816
Wavelength Tables of the Spectra of the Elements and Compounds Report
826
Address by the President Professor E Ray Laukestbb M A LL D
3
Corrosion By S CowrEB Coles 074
74

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 682 - By means of this men are able to control or direct the forces of nature, to make rain or sunshine, wind or calm, to cause sickness or remove it, to know what is far off in time and space, to bring good luck and prosperity, or to blast and curse." "By whatever name it is called, it is the belief in this supernatural power, and in the efficacy of the various means by which spirits and ghosts can be induced to exercise it for the benefit of men, that is the foundation of the rites and practices which...
Page xxvii - To give a stronger impulse and a more systematic direction to scientific inquiry, — to promote the intercourse of those who cultivate Science in different parts of the British Empire, with one another, and with foreign philosophers, — to obtain a more general attention to the objects of Science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public kind which impede its progress.
Page xxx - Sections before the beginning of the Meeting. It has therefore become necessary, in order to give an opportunity to the Committees of doing justice to the several communications, that each Author should prepare an Abstract of his Memoir, of a length suitable for insertion in the published Transactions of the Association, and that...
Page 59 - Year- Book of the Scientific and Learned Societies of Great Britain and Ireland.'"' — (Art. "Societies" in New Edition of •"Encyclopaedia Britannica," vol. xxii.) Copies of the FIRST ISSUE, giving an Account of the History, Organization, and Conditions of Membership of the various Societies, and forming the groundwork of the Series, may still be had, price 7/6.
Page 124 - No theory of evolution can be formed to account for the similarity of molecules, for evolution necessarily implies continuous change, and the molecule is incapable of growth or decay, of generation or destruction.
Page 12 - What is it ? It cannot be destroyed or altered by heat or by chemical agents ; it is a heavy gas, having a molecular density of 100, and it can be condensed to a liquid by exposing it to the great cold of liquid air. It gives a peculiar spectrum of its own, and is probably a hitherto unknown inert gas — a new element similar to argon. But this by no means completes its history, even so far as experiments have as yet gone. The radium emanation decays, changes its character altogether, and loses...
Page xxx - If it should be inconvenient to the Author that his paper should be read on any particular days, he is requested to send information thereof to the Secretaries in a separate note.
Page 709 - European or a Chinese. But the operation of instinct is more sure and simple than that of reason. It is much easier to ascertain the appetites of a quadruped, than the speculations of a philosopher ; and the savage tribes of mankind, as they approach nearer to the condition of animals, preserve a stronger resemblance to themselves and to each other. The uniform stability of their manners is the natural consequence of the imperfection of their faculties. Reduced to a similar situation, their wants...
Page 12 - ... the same rate as it decays the specimen of radium salt from which it was removed forms a new quantity of emanation, having just the amount of radio-activity which has been lost by the old emanation. All is not known about the decay of the emanation, but one thing is absolutely certain, having first been discovered by Ramsay and Soddy and subsequently confirmed by independent experiment by Madame Curie. It is this : After being kept three or four days the emanation becomes, in part at least, converted...
Page 30 - ... there is no ground for holding its occurrence to be probable, but, on the contrary, strong reason for holding it to be improbable. Since the old character (length, breadth, weight) had not become fixed and congenital after many thousands of successive generations of individuals had developed it in response to environment, but gave place to a new character when new conditions operated on an individual (Lamarck's first law), why should we suppose that the new character is likely to become fixed...

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