What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal ComputerIndustry

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Penguin, Apr 21, 2005 - History - 336 pages
48 Reviews
Most histories of the personal computer industry focus on technology or business. John Markoff’s landmark book is about the culture and consciousness behind the first PCs—the culture being counter– and the consciousness expanded, sometimes chemically. It’s a brilliant evocation of Stanford, California, in the 1960s and ’70s, where a group of visionaries set out to turn computers into a means for freeing minds and information. In these pages one encounters Ken Kesey and the phone hacker Cap’n Crunch, est and LSD, The Whole Earth Catalog and the Homebrew Computer Lab. What the Dormouse Said is a poignant, funny, and inspiring book by one of the smartest technology writers around.
 

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Review: What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry

User Review  - Richard Curry - Goodreads

Survey of the topic. Myriad pertinent and idiosyncratic (!) details are included with just a paragraph or brief reference. Many of the topics covered (or perhaps omitted) have been (or could be) the ... Read full review

Review: What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry

User Review  - Deane - Goodreads

The title promised a discussion about how the 60s "shaped" the personal computer industry, but I just didn't see it. The book is a history of technology and how the seminal figures of that period ... Read full review

All 25 reviews »

Contents

PREFACE
1 THE PROPHET AND THE TRUE BELIEVERS
2 AUGMENTATION
3 REDDIAPER BABY
4 FREE U
5 DEALING LIGHTNING
6 SCHOLARS AND BARBARIANS
7 MOMENTUM
8 BORROWING FIRE FROM THE GODS
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
NOTES
BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

John Markoff is Professor of Sociology and History at the University of Pittsburgh.

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