A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening, Adapted to North America: With a View to the Improvement of Country Residences ... With Remarks on Rural Architecture ...

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G. P. Putnam, 1850 - Architecture, Domestic - 532 pages
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Page 296 - Behold, the Assyrian was a cedar in Lebanon with fair branches, and with a shadowing shroud, and of an high stature ; and his top was among the thick boughs.
Page 32 - With, mazy error under pendant shades Ran nectar, visiting each plant, and fed Flowers worthy of Paradise, which not nice Art In beds and curious knots, but Nature boon Poured forth profuse on hill, and dale, and plain...
Page 29 - I, for my part, do not like images cut out in juniper or other garden stuff; they be for children.
Page 168 - There is no instance of a man before Gibbons who gave to wood the loose and airy lightness of flowers, and chained together the various productions of the elements with a free disorder natural to each species.
Page 408 - ... throw in a semblance of green summer to cheer the fire-side : all these bespeak the influence of taste, flowing down from high sources, and pervading the lowest levels of the public mind. If ever Love, as poets sing, delights to visit a cottage, it must be the cottage of an English peasant.
Page 30 - The Tower of Babel, not yet finished. St. George in box : his arm scarce long enough, but will be in a condition to stick the dragon by next April. A green dragon of the same, with a tail of ground-ivy for the present.
Page 160 - The quivering glimmer of sun and rill With a sudden flash on the eye is thrown, Like the ray that streams from the...
Page 407 - ... nice distribution of flowers and plants of tender and graceful foliage; the introduction of a green slope of velvet turf; the partial opening to a peep of blue distance, or silver gleam of water: all these are managed with a delicate tact, a pervading yet quiet assiduity, like the magic touchings with which a painter finishes up a favorite picture.
Page 32 - Both where the morning sun first warmly smote The open field, and where the unpierced shade Imbrown'd the noontide bowers ; thus was this place A happy rural seat of various view...
Page 173 - ... barren spot to me ! Spare, woodman, spare the beechen tree ! Though bush or floweret never grow My dark unwarming shade below ; Nor summer bud perfume the dew Of rosy blush, or yellow hue ; Nor fruits of autumn, blossom-born, My green and glossy leaves adorn ; Nor murmuring tribes from me derive Th...

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