The Advertisements of the Spectator

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Houghton Mifflin, 1909 - Advertising - 307 pages
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Page 73 - like a distressed prince who calls in a powerful neighbour to his aid. I was undone by my auxiliary. When I had once called him in, I could not subsist without dependence on him.
Page 115 - IT gives me much despair in the design of reforming the world by my speculations, when I find there always arise, from one generation to another, successive cheats and bubbles, as naturally as beasts of prey, and thqse which are to be their food.
Page 110 - Steele was arrested the other day for making a lottery, directly against an act of parliament. He is now under prosecution ; but they think it will be dropped out of pity. I believe he will very soon lose his employment, for he has been mighty impertinent of late in his Spectators ; and I will never offer a word in his behalf.
Page vi - A second use which this sort of writings have been turned to of late years, has been the management of controversy, insomuch that above half the advertisements one meets with now-a-days are purely polemical. The inventors of Strops for Razors...
Page 38 - Our streets are filled with blue boars, black swans, and red lions ; not to mention flying pigs, and hogs in armour, with many other creatures more extraordinary than any in the deserts of Africa.
Page v - ... prints. These I consider as accounts of news from the little world, in the same manner that the foregoing parts of the paper are from the great. If in one we hear that a sovereign prince is fled from his capital city, in the other we hear of a tradesman who hath shut up his shop, and run away.
Page vi - Fields, is celebrated in the same paper with the Emperor of Germany. Thus the fable tells us, " That the wren mounted as high as the eagle, by getting upon his back.
Page 63 - The Observator is fallen ; the Medleys are jumbled together with the Flying Post; the Examiner is deadly sick ; the Spectator keeps up and doubles its price : I know not how long it will last.
Page ix - THOUGH some make slight of libels, yet you may see by them how the wind sits : as take a straw and throw it up into the air, you shall see by that which way the wind is, which you shall not do by casting up a stone. More solid things do not show the complexion of the times so well as ballads and libels.
Page ix - Though some make slight of Libels, yet you may see by them how the wind sits : As, take a straw and throw it up into the air, you may see by that which way the wind is, which you shall not do by casting up a stone.

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