The Bell Jar

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Aug 2, 2005 - Fiction - 288 pages
1440 Reviews

The Bell Jar chronicles the crack-up of Esther Greenwood: brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under -- maybe for the last time. Sylvia Plath masterfully draws the reader into Esther's breakdown with such intensity that Esther's insanity becomes completely real and even rational, as probable and accessible an experience as going to the movies. Such deep penetration into the dark and harrowing corners of the psyche is an extraordinary accomplishment and has made The Bell Jar a haunting American classic.

This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.

 

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5 stars
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4 stars
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3 stars
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2 stars
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1 star
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Very creative writing style and story telling. - Goodreads
I thought it'll be very boring and hard to read. - Goodreads
The prose of this book is beautiful. - Goodreads
I hate writing reviews that contrast popular thought. - Goodreads
I found the imagery and writing lovely. - Goodreads
The ending was beyond anticlimactic. - Goodreads

Review: The Bell Jar

User Review  - Kate Powers - Goodreads

I can't believe I hadn't read this book until now. The journey Sylvia Plath takes the reader on is unlike anything I have ever read. Reading it made me feel as though I had VIP access to the inner ... Read full review

Review: The Bell Jar

User Review  - Jaida Regan - Goodreads

Plath's Esther Greenwood had an alternative path than which Capote's Holly Golightly took, one which combatted mental health. Similarly, their character's lives took a turn when landing in New York city. Read full review

All 12 reviews »

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
14
Section 3
24
Section 4
38
Section 5
50
Section 6
63
Section 7
74
Section 8
87
Section 13
154
Section 14
170
Section 15
184
Section 16
195
Section 17
204
Section 18
215
Section 19
224
Section 20
236

Section 9
99
Section 10
112
Section 11
127
Section 12
140
Section 21
247
Section 22
260
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Sylvia Plath was born in 1932 in Massachusetts. Her books include the poetry collections The Colossus, Crossing the Water, Winter Trees, Ariel, and The Collected Poems, which won the Pulitzer Prize. A complete and uncut facsimile edition of Ariel was published in 2004 with her original selection and arrangement of poems. She was married to the poet Ted Hughes, with whom she had a daughter, Frieda, and a son, Nicholas. She died in London in 1963.

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