Capital

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Oxford University Press, 1999 - Political Science - 499 pages
A classic of early modernism, Capital combines vivid historical detail with economic analysis to produce a bitter denunciation of mid-Victorian capitalist society. It has also proved to be the most influential work in social science in the twentieth century; Marx did for social science what Darwin had done for biology. Millions of readers this century have treated Capital as a sacred text, subjecting it to as many different interpretations as the Bible itself. No mere work of dry economics, Marx's great work depicts the unfolding of industrial capitalism as a tragic drama - with a message which has lost none of its relevance today. This is the only abridged edition to take account of the whole of Capital. It offers virtually all of Volume 1, which Marx himself published in 1867, excerpts from a new translation of 'The Result of the Immediate Process of Production', and a selection of key chapters from Volume 3, which Engels published in 1895.

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Karl Marx’s technical masterpiece painstakingly, and often dramatically, roots out the causes of social and economic inequality. Unlike "The Communist Manifesto", which he wrote with Friedrich Engels, this classic text is not a call to revolution but rather a comprehensive and systematic analysis and “critique of political economy,” according to its original subtitle. Marx spent 15 years working on just the first volume of his complex masterwork. In it he details the “surplus value” that workers create for those who own the “means of production,” and how exploitative capitalists sell their goods not to purchase other goods, but to increase their own wealth. “Money making money,” or the capital accumulation process, lies at the heart of Marx’s critique of capitalism. getAbstract recommends his seminal work to those who wish to understand the origins of arguably the most disruptive work of political and economic philosophy of the 20th century.
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About the author (1999)

David McLellan is Professor of Political Theory at the University of Kent.

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