The Principles of Socialism Made Plain: And Objections, Methods, and Quack Remedies for Poverty Considered

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W. Reeves, 1888 - Socialism - 148 pages
 

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Page 97 - The greater part, in value, of the wealth now existing in England has been produced by human hands within the last twelve months.
Page 55 - The distinction, then, between Capital and Not-capital, does not lie in the kind of commodities, but in the mind of the capitalist — in his will to employ them for one purpose rather than another ; and all property, however ill adapted in itself for the use of labourers, is a part of capital, so soon as it, or the value to be received from it, is set apart for productive reinvestment.
Page 47 - IT has been seen in the preceding chapters that besides the primary and universal requisites of production, labour and natural agents, there is another requisite without which no productive operations beyond the rude and scanty beginnings of primitive industry, are possible: namely, a stock, previously accumulated, of the products of former labour. ( This accumulated stock of the produce of labour is termed Capital.
Page 48 - Essays) a name not unfrequently passes by successive links of resemblance from one object to another, until it becomes applied to things having nothing in common with the first things to which the name was given; which, however, do not, for that reason, drop the name; so that it at last denotes a confused huddle of objects, having nothing whatever in common; and connotes nothing, not even a vague and general resemblance.
Page 146 - Poverty, Taxation, and the Remedy: Free Trade, Free labour: or, Direct Taxation the True Principle of Political Economy.
Page 70 - Money is no more synonymous with capital than it is with wealth. Money cannot in itself perform any part of the office of capital, since it can afford no assistance to production.
Page 53 - The word saving does not imply that what is saved is not consumed, nor even necessarily that its consumption is deferred; but only that, if consumed immediately, it is not consumed by the person who saves it.
Page 120 - What I do intend to assert is, that the portion which is destined to their maintenance, may (supposing no alteration in anything else) be indefinitely increased, without creating an impossibility of finding them employment: in other words, that if there are human beings capable of work, and food to feed them, they may always be employed in producing something.
Page 97 - ... had not been employed within that period in putting them into repair. The land subsists, and the land is almost the only thing that subsists. Everything which is produced perishes, and most things very quickly.
Page 146 - The Peer and the Prophet: being the Duke of Argyll's Article on " The Prophet of San Francisco," and the Reply of Henry George, entitled " The Reduction to Iniquity,

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