Snowflakes and Sunbeams, Or, The Young Fur Traders: A Tale of the Far North

Front Cover
T. Nelson, 1856 - Adventure stories - 429 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 379 - ... be no female, said she, the figure and manners, the countenance, and more especially the expression of the eyes, are, beyond a doubt, those of a man. Her husband immediately rejected her suspicions, and rebuked her severely for the indignity offered to her daughter-in-law. He became so angry, that seizing the first thing that came to hand, which happened to be his pipe stem, he beat her unmercifully. This act requiring to be explained to the spectators, the mock bride immediately rose up, and...
Page 289 - Roughing it" I certainly have been, inasmuch as I have been living on rough fare, associating with rough men, and sleeping on rough beds under the starry sky; but I assure you that all this is not half so rough upon the constitution as what they call leading an easy life, which is simply a life that makes a poor fellow stagnate, body and spirit, till the one comes to be unable to digest its food, and the other incompetent to jump at so much as half an idea.
Page 105 - Having thus prepared dried-meat, lay a quantity of it on a flat stone, and take another stone, with which pound it into shreds. You must then take the animal's hide, while it is yet new, and make bags of it about two feet and a half long, by a foot and a half broad. Into this put the pounded meat loosely. Melt the fat of your buffalo over a fire, and, when quite liquid, pour it into the bag until full ; mix the contents well together ; sew the whole up before it cools, and you have a bag of pemican...
Page 95 - why won't you stay?" " Listen to me, dearest Kate," said Charley, in a very husky voice. " It's too late to draw back now, even if I wished to do so ; and you don't consider, darling, that I'll be back again soon. Besides, I'ma man now, Kate, and I must make my own bread. Who ever heard of a man being supported by his old father?
Page 126 - ... it would be hard to say which of the two is the more disagreeable. Should the mon be careless in arranging the cargo, the inevitable consequence is, that
Page 25 - Charley's eyes had been cast on the ground while Mr Grant was speaking. He now raised them, looked at his father, then at his interrogator, and said — "It is very kind of you both to be so anxious about my prospects. I thank you, indeed, very much; but I — a — " "Don't like the desk?" said his father, in an angry tone. "Is that it, eh?

Bibliographic information