World History

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D. C. Heath, 1921 - World history - 755 pages
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Contents

The Ancient Orient
26
The Lands of the Near East
29
XI
30
The Peoples of the Near East
32
Social Conditions
40
Economic Conditions
44
Commerce and Commercial Routes
46
Law and Morality
49
Religion
52
Literature and Art
55
Science
60
Orient and Occident
62
The Mediterranean Basin
68
The Egeans
71
The Greeks
73
The Greek CityStates
79
Colonial Expansion of Greece
82
The Persian Wars 490479 B c
84
Athens 479431 B C
89
Athenian Culture
93
Decline of the Greek CityStates 431338 B C
97
Alexander the Great and the Conquest of Persia
101
The Hellenistic Age
105
Rome
107
Italian Peoples
112
The Romans
115
The Roman CityState
119
Expansion of Rome over Italy og ?264 b c
121
Expansion of Rome beyond Italy 264133 B C
123
Rome the Mistress of the Mediterranean Basin
129
Decline of the Roman CityState 13331 B C
132
The Early Empire 31 B c284 a d
138
The World under Roman Rule
144
Christianity in the Roman World
151
The Later Empire 284476 a d
155
The Middle Ages
156
The Germans
157
The Holy Roman Empire
161
The Northmen and the Normans
166
Feudalism
169
The Byzantine Empire
176
The Arabs and Islam 6221058
180
The Crusades 10951291
187
Mongolian Peoples in Europe to 1453
190
National States during the Later Middle Ages
194
Medieval Civilization 51 The Church
203
The Clergy
207
The Papacy
211
Country Life
214
Serfdom
219
City Life
221
Civic Industry
225
Civic Trade
228
Cathedrals and Universities
231
National Languages during the Later Middle Ages
236
VU The Renaissance
239
Revival of Learning and Art in Italy
240
Revival of Learning and Art beyond Italy
245
HAPTEE PAGE 63 Geographical Discovery
248
Colonial Empires
253
The Old World and the New
255
The Protestant Reformation
257
The Protestant Sects
263
The Catholic Counter Reformation
266
The Religious Wars
269
The European State System
278
The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries in Europe 71 Absolutism and the Divine Right of Kings
281
The Struggle against Stuart Absolutism in England
282
The Restoration and the Glorious Revolution
291
Absolutism of Louis XIV in France 16431715
299
Russia under Peter the Great 16891725
302
Russia under Catherine II 17621796
307
Austria and Maria Theresa 17401780
309
N Prussia and Frederick the Great 17401786
310
The Partitions of Poland 17721795
314
Mercantilism and Trading Companies
320
The Dutch Colonial Empire
322
Rivalry of France and England in India to 1763
325
Rivalry of France and England in North America
328
The American Revolution 17761783
334
Formation of the United States
341
Progress of Geographical Discovery
342
The Old Regime 87 Reform
346
The Privileged Classes
347
The Unprivileged Classes
349
The Church
351
Liberal Ideas of Industry and Commerce the Economists
354
The Scientists
355
Liberal Ideas of Religion and Politics the English Philosophers
357
The French Philosophers
359
The Enlightened Despots
362
The Revolutionary and Napoleonic Era 17891815
366
The EstatesGeneral 1789
371
The Continental System
398
Revolt of the Nations 18081814
401
Downfall of Napoleon 18141815
404
11o Liberty Equality Fraternity 366 37o 373 376 S79 384 387 3QO 393 394 397 398 400 404
407
The Democratic Movement in Europe 18151848
410
The Congress of Vienna
413
Territorial Readjustments
415
dis Mettcrnichismus and the Concert of Europe
419
France and the July Revolution 1830
424
The July Revolution in Europe
426
The February Revolution and the Second French Republic 1848
432
The February Revolution in Europe
435
The National Movement in Europe 18481871
440
Napoleon III and the Second French Empire
442
Disunited Italy
447
Victor Emmanuel II and Cavour
450
United Italy 18591870
452
Disunited Germany
456
William I and Bismarck
459
United Germany 18641871
461
The United Kingdom and the British Empire 128 Parliamentary Reform 1832
468
Political Democracy 18321867
473
Political Democracy 18671918
477
Government of the United Kingdom
479
The Irish Question
486
The British Empire
490
The Continental Countries 134 The Third French Republic
498
Italy Spain Portugal and Belgium
505
Switzerland Holland Denmark Norway and Sweden
510
The German Empire 18711918
513
The Dual Monarchy 18671918
519
The Russian Empire
521
The Ottoman Empire and the Balkan States
529
XYT Colonial Expansion and World Politics 141 Greater Europe
540
The Openingup of Africa
542
The Partition of Africa
546
The Openingup and Partition of Asia
550
India
553
China
555
147 Japan
560
The Openingup and Partition of Oceania
563
Australia and New Zealand
565
Canada
566
Latin America
568
The United States
573
Close of Geographical Discovery
577
The Industrial Revolution 154 Modern Industrialism
581
The Great Inventions
583
Effects of the Great Inventions
588
Improvements in Transportation
592
Improved Communications
597
Commerce
600
Agriculture and Land Tenure
605
The Labor Movement
609
Government Regulation of Industry
610
Public Ownership
614
Socialism
616
Poverty and Progress
620
Internationalism
625
Social Betterment
628
Emancipation of Women and Children
632
Popular Education and the Higher Learning
634
Religious Development
636
Science
641
Literature
644
Music and the Fine Arts
646
International Relations 18711914
650
The Dual Alliance and the Triple Entente
652
Colonial Problems
656
The Eastern Question
658
Militarism
661
PanGermanism
665
The World War 19141918
668
Beginning of the War 1914
669
The Western Front
674
The Eastern Front
680
The Balkan and Italian Fronts
682
The War outside of Europe and on the Sea 1914
689
Intervention of the United States
690
The Russian Revolution
697
End of the War 1918
700
The World Settlement 19191921
707
i8g Peace with Germany
710
Peace with Austria Hungary Bulgaria and Turkey
713
The New Nations in Central Europe
715
The New Nations in Eastern Europe
717
Democracy and Socialism
719
Economic Reconstruction
723
The League of Nations
725
The Disarmament Conference
730
Appendix Table of Events and Dates
735
Index and Pronouncing Vocabulary
741

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Page 719 - In order to promote international co-operation and to achieve international peace and security by the acceptance of obligations not to resort to war, by the prescription of open, just and honourable relations between nations, by the firm establishment of the understandings of international law as the actual rule of conduct among Governments, and by the maintenance of justice and a scrupulous respect for all treaty obligations in the dealings of organised peoples with one another, Agree to this Covenant...
Page 687 - A general association of nations must be formed under specific covenants for the purpose of affording mutual guarantees of political independence and territorial integrity to great and small States alike.
Page 494 - My hold of the colonies is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are as strong as links of iron. Let the colonies always keep the idea of their civil rights associated with your government; they will cling and grapple to you, and no force under heaven will be of power to tear them from their allegiance. But let it...
Page 287 - Here lies our Sovereign Lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Page 628 - The first amendment to the Constitution of the United States provides that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
Page 244 - And all depends on keeping the eye steadily fixed upon the facts of nature and so receiving their images simply as they are. For God forbid that we should give out a dream of our own imagination for a pattern of the world...
Page 722 - If the said rights are threatened by the aggressive action of any other Power, the High Contracting Parties shall communicate with one another fully and frankly in order to arrive at an understanding as to the most efficient measures to be taken, jointly or separately, to meet the exigencies of the particular situation.
Page 285 - I raised such men as had the fear of God before them, and made some conscience of what they did...
Page 94 - An Athenian citizen does not neglect the state because he takes care of his own i household; and even those of us who are engaged in business have a very fair idea of politics. We alone regard a man who takes no interest in public affairs, not as a harmless, but as a useless character; and if few of us are originators, we are all sound judges of a policy.
Page 302 - I had good interpreters, so I had much free discourse with him. He is a man of a very hot temper, soon inflamed and very brutal in his passion. He raises his natural heat by drinking much brandy, which he rectifies himself with great application. He is subject to convulsive motions all over his body, and his head seems to be affected with these. He wants not capacity, and has a larger measure of knowledge than might be expected from his education...

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