City of Eros: New York City, Prostitution, and the Commercialization of Sex, 1790-1920

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1994 - History - 462 pages
13 Reviews
Prostitution in New York City flourished throughout the 19th century, offering high profits to landlords and fueled by immigration, low female wages, political corruption, and the sexual mores of the age. Gilfoyle's study, based on his 1987 Ph.D. dissertation, analyzes New York prostitution's growth and ultimate decline, its operation, its opposition, and (perhaps rather too minutely) its geographical distribution. He points to the political system that supported red light districts and to the overlap of commercialized sex with socially respectable entertainment.
 

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Review: City of Eros: New York City, Prostitution, and the Commercialization of Sex, 1790-1920

User Review  - Goodreads

Comprehensive, great for research. Read full review

Review: City of Eros: New York City, Prostitution, and the Commercialization of Sex, 1790-1920

User Review  - Goodreads

I was researching prostitution in Victorian New York for a novel I'm writing, and this gives a pretty broad view of how the trade developed as the city did. Read full review

Contents

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
11
INTRODUCTION
17
HOLY GROUNDS
23
THE WHOREARCHY
55
BROTHEL RIOTS AND BROADWAY PIMPS
76
SPORTING MEN
92
HALCYON YEARS
121
A GAY LITERATURE
143
COMSTOCKS NEW YORK
179
SEX DISTRICTS REVISITED
197
CONCERT HALLS AND FRENCH BALLS
224
SYNDICATES AND UNDERWORLDS
251
WHITE SLAVES AND KEPT WOMEN
270
UNDERMINING THE UNDERWORLD
298
A SELECTION OF BROTHEL OWNERS IN NEW YORK
317
Copyright

BAWDY HOUSES
161

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About the author (1994)

Timothy J. Gilfoyle is an acclaimed historian. His first book, City of Eros, won the prestigious Nevins Prize, awarded by the Society of American Historians. He is professor of history at Loyola University in Chicago.

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