The fine arts in England; their states and prospects considered relatively to national education

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1840
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Page 113 - A THING of beauty is a joy for ever : Its loveliness increases ; it will never Pass into nothingness ; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
Page 57 - Provided also, and be it declared and enacted, That any declaration before mentioned shall not extend to any letters patents and grants of privilege for the term of fourteen years or under, hereafter to be made, of the sole working or making of any manner of new manufactures within this realm, to the true and first inventor and inventors of such manufactures, which others at the time of making such letters patents and grants shall not use...
Page 50 - ... any historical print or prints, or any print or prints of any portrait, conversation, landscape, or architecture, map, chart, or plan, or any other print or prints whatsoever...
Page 313 - Change wide, and deep, and silently performed, This Land shall witness ; and as days roll on, Earth's universal Frame shall feel the effect Even till the smallest habitable Rock, Beaten by lonely billows, hear the songs Of humanized Society ; and bloom With civil arts, that send their fragrance forth, A grateful tribute to all-ruling Heaven.
Page v - to inquire into the best means of extending a knowledge of the arts, and of the principles of design, among the people (especially the manufacturing population) of the country ; also to inquire into the constitution, management, and effects of institutions connected with the arts.
Page 57 - ... the true and first inventor and inventors of such manufactures, which others at the time of making such Letters Patent and grants shall not use, so as also they be not contrary to the law nor mischievous to the State by raising prices of commodities at home, or hurt of trade, or generally inconvenient...
Page 298 - Whatever forces a certain number of students to any college or university, independent of the merit or reputation of the teachers, tends more or less to diminish the necessity of that merit or reputation.
Page 290 - On the best consideration that I have been able to give to this...
Page 285 - Lords have in view the encouragement of local efforts for the improvement and extension of elementary education, whether made by voluntary associations or by private individuals. The employment of Inspectors is therefore intended to advance this object, by affording to the promoters of schools an opportunity of ascertaining, at the periodical visits of inspection, what improvements in...
Page 280 - ... the same period in the non-reporting districts, making a grand total of upwards of 400,500 children thus under instruction in all the common schools of the state, exceeding by nearly 26,000 the number under instruction during the preceding year : . 5. That the whole number of children between the ages of five and fifteen years, residing in the several districts from which reports were received, was about 373,000 : 6.

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