Explaining Pakistan’s Foreign Policy: Escaping India

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Taylor & Francis, Mar 16, 2011 - Political Science - 256 pages

Pakistan has over the decades become a hotbed for the terrorist ideology often referred to as Jihadism. This book investigates the underlying principles of Pakistan’s foreign policy from 1947 until the present day, and explains the rise of Jihadism as an offshoot of Pakistan’s security concerns.

The book goes on to discuss that from its inception as a separate state, Pakistan’s foreign policy focused on ‘seeking parity’ with India and ‘escaping’ from an Indian South Asian identity. The desire to achieve parity with its much larger neighbour led Pakistan to seek the assistance and support of allies. The author analyses the relationship Pakistan has with Afghanistan, United States, China and the Muslim world, and looks at how these relationships are based on the desire that military, economic and diplomatic aid from these countries would bolster Pakistan’s meagre resources in countering Indian economic and military strength. The book presents an interesting contribution to South Asian Studies, as well as studies on International Relations and Foreign Policy.

 

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Contents

1 Constructing political identity
1
2 Existential threat
28
3 Strategic depth
59
4 An alliance to ensure survival
88
5 Allweather friendship
114
6 Virtual relocation
136
7 Pragmatic bilateralism
165
Notes
175
Bibliography
214
Index
236
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About the author (2011)

Aparna Pande is a Research Fellow at the Hudson Institute in Washington DC, USA. She has a doctorate in Political Science from Boston University and her main research interest is International Relations focusing on South Asia.