A guide to the lakes ... in Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire, by the author of The antiquities of Furness

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1812
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Page 206 - ... flew screaming round, but did not dare to attack him. He brought off the eaglet (for there is rarely more than one) and an addle egg.
Page 213 - ... spread far and wide round the town, which I mistook for houses. My inn promised sadly, having two wooden galleries (like Scotland) in front of it. It was indeed an old ill-contrived house, but kept by civil sensible people, so I stayed two nights with them, and fared and slept very comfortably.
Page 204 - ... sun, which glanced sideways on the upper part of the cataract. The force of the water wearing a deep channel in the ground hurries away to join the lake. We descended again, and passed the stream over a rude bridge. Soon after we came under...
Page 207 - Walked to Crow-Park, now a rough pasture, once a glade of ancient oaks, whose large roots still remain on the ground, but nothing has sprung from them. If one single tree had remained, this would have been an unparalleled spot ; and Smith judged right when he took his print of the Lake from hence, for it is a gentle eminence, not too high...
Page 204 - Lodoor water-fall, the height appears to be about 200 feet, the quantity of water not great, though (these three days excepted) it had rained daily in the hills for near two months before: but then the stream was nobly broken, leaping from rock to rock, and foaming with fury. On one side a towering crag, that spired up to equal, if not overtop, the neighbouring cliffs (this lay all in shade and darkness) on the other hand a rounder broader projecting hill shagged with wood and illumined by the sun,...
Page 211 - ... turf, that half conceal and vary the figure of the little lake they command ; from the shore a low promontory pushes itself far into the water, and on it stands a white village with the parish...
Page 209 - I mean to bid farewell to Keswick. Botany might be studied here to great advantage at another season, because of the great variety of soils and elevations, all lying within a small compass. I observed nothing but several curious - lichens, and plenty of gale or Dutch myrtle perfuming the borders of the lake. This year the Wadd-mine had been opened, which is done once in five years ; it is taken out in lumps sometimes as big as a man's fist, and will undergo no preparation by fire, not being fusible...
Page 217 - ... sands) told me in his dialect a moving story. How a brother of the trade, a cockier (as he styled him), driving a little cart with two daughters (women grown) in it, and his wife on horseback following, set out one day to pass the...
Page 207 - Castle-hill (which you remember) because this is lower and nearer to the Lake: for I find all points that are much elevated spoil the beauty of the valley, and make its parts (which are not large) look poor and diminutive. While I was here, a little shower fell, red clouds came marching up the hills from the east, and part of a bright rainbow seemed to rise along the side of Castle-hill.
Page 195 - ... immense amphitheatre ; while the vast shadow, projected by the mountains, buries the opposite part in a deep and purple gloom, which the eye can hardly penetrate. The natural variety of colouring which the...

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