A treatise on the manufacture, imitation, adulteration, and reduction of foreign wines, brandies, gins, rums, etc

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Pub. for the author, 1860 - Alcoholic beverages - 196 pages
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Page 180 - This air may afterwards pass off through a hole of two and a half inches diameter, in the uppermost cover, in which a funnel is placed for the supply of liquor, as it is wanted to keep up the percolation. "The temperature of the fermenting compartment is ascertained by means of a thermometer, whose bulb is inserted in a hole through its side, and. fastened by a perforated cork. The liquor collected in the under vessel runs off by a siphon, inserted near its bottom, the leg of which turns up to nearly...
Page 111 - ... of meal, after which the malt is introduced and stirred, and lastly the rye is added. Powerful agitation is given to the magma till it becomes quite uniform ; a process which a vigorous workman piques himself upon executing in the course of a few minutes. The mouth of the tun is immediately covered over with canvas...
Page 113 - ... low wine still, and the fine Hollands spirit is drawn off by a gentle and well-regulated heat, till the magma becomes exhausted; the first and the last products being mixed together; whereby a spirit, 2 to 3 per cent, above our hydrometer proof, is obtained, possessing the peculiar fine aroma of gin. The quantity of spirit...
Page 44 - In grinding, the most perfect machinery should be used to reduce the whole fruit, skin, and seeds, to a fine pulp. This should, if possible, be performed in cool weather. The late Joseph Cooper, of New Jersey, has observed emphatically, that "the longer a cheese lies after being ground, before pressing, the better for the cider, provided it escapes fermentation until the pressing is completed;" and he further observes, " that a sour apple, after being bruised on one side, becomes rich and sweet after...
Page 179 - The chips should be prepared for this purpose by being repeatedly scalded in boiling water, then dried, and imbued with hot vinegar. The same measures may also be adopted for the tub. To provide for the renewal of the air, the tub is perforated, at about a foot from its bottom, with eight holes, set equally apart round the circumference, two-thirds of an inch wide, and sloping down, through which the air may enter into this lower compartment, without the trickling liquor being allowed to flow out....
Page 125 - ... sweets, as fresher lees. The wort is made, in Jamaica, by adding to 1000 gallons of dunder, 120 gallons of molasses, 720 gallons of skimmings ( = 120 of molasses in sweetness), and 160 gallons of water; so that there may be in the liquid nearly 12 per cent of solid sugar. Another proportion, often used, is 100 gallons of molasses, 200 gallons of lees, .400 gallons of skimmings, and 400 of water; the mixture containing, therefore, 15 per cent, of sweets.
Page 110 - Ħs also made in Holland, and hence called Hollands gin in this country, to distinguish it from British gin. The materials employed in the distilleries of Schiedam, are two parts of unmalted rye from Riga, weighing about 54 Ibs. per bushel, and one part of malted bigg, weighing about 37 Ibs. per bushel. The mash tun, which serves also as the fermenting tun, has a capacity of nearly 700 gallons, being about 5 feet in diameter at the mouth, rather narrower at the bottom, and...
Page 45 - Let the liquor be immediately placed in a cool cellar, in remarkably strong, tight, sweet casks; after the pulp has all overflown, confine the liquor down by driving the bung hard and by sealing; a vent must be left, and the spile carefully drawn at times, but only when absolutely necessary to prevent the cask from bursting. The charcoal, as recommended by Mr. Knight, deserves trial. Fresh and sweet pomace directly from the press, and boiled or steamed and mixed with a small portion of meal, is a...
Page 111 - The mouth of the tun is immediately covered over with canvas, and further secured by a close wooden lid, to confine the heat ; it is left in this state for two hours. The contents being then stirred up once more, the transparent spent wash of a preceding mashing is first added, and next as much cold water as will reduce the temperature of the whole to about 85° F. The best Flanders yeast, which had been brought, for the sake of carriage, to a doughy consistence by pressure, is now introduced to...
Page 125 - The rum imported into Victoria in 1858 was valued at £70,519.t Jamaica rum. — Rum is distilled from the fermented skimmings of the sugar-pans, or teaches, mixed with molasses and diluted with water to the proper degree. " The wort is made in Jamaica by adding to 1000 gallons of spent-wash, or dunder, 120 gallons of molasses, 720 gallons of skimmings (=120 molasses in sweetness) and 160 gallons of water, so that there may be in the liquid nearly 12 per cent. by weight of solid saccharum, or pure...

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