An Encyclopędia of Gardening: Comprising the Theory and Practice of Horticulture, Floriculture, Arboriculture, and Landscape Gardening; Including All the Latest Improvements; a General History of Gardening in All Countries; and a Statistical View of Its Present State; with Suggestions for Its Future Progress in the British Isles

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Longman, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, 1860 - Gardening - 1278 pages
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Page 248 - At that moment appeared Kent, painter enough to taste the charms of landscape, bold and opinionative enough to dare and to dictate, and born with a genius to strike out a great system from the twilight of imperfect essays.
Page xxxvi - SELF-INSTRUCTION FOR YOUNG GARDENERS, Foresters, Bailiffs, Land Stewards, and Farmers ; in Arithmetic, Book-keeping, Geometry, Mensuration, Practical Trigonometry, Mechanics, Land-Surveying, Levelling, Planning and Mapping, Architectural Drawing, and Isometrical Projection and Perspective ; with Examples shewing their applications to Horticulture and Agricultural Purposes.
Page xxvi - THE FRUITS AND FRUIT TREES OF AMERICA, Or, the Culture, Propagation, and Management in the Garden and Orchard of Fruit Trees generally; with descriptions of all the finest varieties of fruit, native and foreign, cultivated in this country.
Page 428 - in the pride of half knowledge, smiled at the means frequently employed by gardeners, to protect tender plants from cold, as it appeared to me impossible that a thin mat, or any such flimsy substance, could prevent them from attaining the temperature of the atmosphere, by which alone I thought them liable to be injured. But, when I had learned that bodies on the surface of the earth become, during a...
Page 10 - GOD ALMIGHTY first planted a garden. And indeed it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man ; without which buildings and palaces are but gross...
Page 400 - Their death, decomposition, and decay, afford a certain quantity of organizable matter, which mixes with the earthy materials of the rock ; in this improved soil, more perfect plants are capable of subsisting. These, in their turn, absorb nourishment from water and the atmosphere, and, after perishing, afford new materials to those already provided. The decomposition of the rock still continues ; and at length, by slow and gradual processes, a soil...
Page 238 - There are everywhere so many statues that seem to breathe so many miracles of consummate art, so many casts that rival even the perfection of Roman antiquity, that it may well claim and justify its name of Nonesuch, being without an equal...
Page 407 - The specific gravity of a soil, or the relation of its weight to that of water, may be ascertained by introducing into a phial, which will contain a known quantity of water, equal volumes of water and of soil ; and this may be easily done by...
Page v - Woodcuts, at'lO, cloth. LOUDON.-AN ENCYCLOPEDIA OF GARDENING; Presenting, in one systematic view, the History and Present State of Gardening in all Countries, and its Theory and Practice in Great Britain: with the Management of the Kitchen Garden, the Flower Garden, Laying-out Grounds, &c. By JC LOUDON, FLS &c.
Page xxvi - Britannicum abridged : Containing the Hardy Trees and Shrubs of Great Britain, Native and Foreign, Scientifically and Popularly Described ; with their Propagation, Culture, and Uses in the Arts ; and with Engravings of nearly all the Species. Adapted for the use of Nurserymen, Gardeners, and Foresters.

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