Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, Volume 53

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Bishop's College Press, 1884 - Asia
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Page 90 - Baitarani on the south, and pouring down the Burabalang, with the feeders of the Subarnarekha, on the north. The peaks are densely wooded to the summit, and, except at the regular passes, are inaccessible to beasts of burden. The intermediate valleys yield rich crops in return for negligent cultivation ; and a vast quantity of land might be reclaimed on their outskirts and lower slopes.
Page 90 - Malayagiri, 3,895 feet high, in the State of Pal Lahara. This watershed, in turn, slopes down into the third valley, that of the Baitarani, from whose eastern or left bank rise the hitherto almost unexplored mountains of Morbhanj, heaped upon each other in noble masses of rock, from 3,000 to nearly 4,000 feet high, sending countless tributaries to the Baitarani on the south, and pouring down the Burabalang, with the feeders of the Subarnarekha, on the north.
Page 90 - Nursingpore and Baramba. On the other side, they slope down upon the States of Hindol and Dhenkanal supplying countless little feeders to the Brahmani, which occupies the second of the three valleys. From the north bank of this river, the hills again roll back into magnificent ranges, running in the same general direction as before, but more confused and wilder, till they rise into the Keunjhar watershed, with peaks from 2500 to 3500 feet high, culminating in Malayagiri, 3,895 feet high, in the State...
Page 90 - Barmul pass the river winds round magnificently wooded hills, from 1,500 to 2,500 feet high. Crags and peaks of a wild beauty overhang its channel, which at one part is so narrow that the water rises 70 feet in time of flood. From the north bank of the MahanadI the ranges tower into a fine watershed, from...
Page 175 - ... large scale. It is, in fact, the most powerful disturbing action to which the air is subject ; and the consequent motion of the air is, when the rainfall and consequent disturbance are excessive, the most violent in its character with which we are acquainted. " The history of the two cyclones has shown most fully that heavy rainfall over the area of cyclonic motion or disturbance was a characteristic feature, and that in this respect they confirm previous experience. Hence the source of the energy...
Page 177 - ... existence of the conditions immediately antecedent to the two storms which the condensation theory asserts to be necessary for the initiation and generation of a cyclonic storm in the Bay. The preceding remarks hence indicate that the energy given out during the process of aqueous vapour condensation on the large scale is the motive power of cyclones, and that the rainfall must be localized and concentrated over a considerable area, for a period of one or more days, in order to produce the continuous...
Page 177 - It is evident that if rainfall tends to set up rotatory motion in the air, it is absolutely necessary for rotatory motion on the large scale that there should not be several separate centres of rainfall and disturbance, each producing its own rotatory or cyclonic action, and therefore interfering with the others. It is essential that the rainfall should be localized and concentrated, that it should continue for some time over a comparatively small area, and be conflned to that area.
Page 177 - ... producing its own rotatory or cyclonic action, and therefore interfering with the others. It is essential that the rainfall should be localised and concentrated, that it should continue for some time over a comparatively small area, and be confined to that area. The more perfectly this is realised, and the longer this continues, the greater will be the accumulated disturbance. In order that the rainfall may occur over the same area for such a considerable period as to permit of the continuous...
Page 175 - ... the whole of which it retains so long as it continues in the vaporous condition. When it is reconverted into water, or condensed as rain, this portion of its total energy is given out, and transferred to the air. The modus operandi of this transfer is a matter of no importance in the present inquiry. Also, in all cases when the rainfall is heavy, and prolonged for a considerable time, the energy is given out at a much more rapid rate than that at which it was absorbed during the process of evaporation....
Page 176 - ... with fine weather, over the north and centre of the Bay, and in Bengal. " The relative importance of these conditions will be evident on very brief consideration. The first is undoubtedly necessary to supply the aqueous vapour in sufficiently large amounts to give rise to a continuous heavy rainfall over such a large area as is covered by a considerable cyclonic disturbance. The Bay of Bengal is not a large enough evaporating area to afford such a supply. Hence cyclonic storms are only formed...

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