Stilwell and the American Experience in China, 1911-45

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Grove Press, 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 621 pages
94 Reviews
Barbara W. Tuchman won the Pulitzer Prize for Stilwell and the American Experience in China, 1911-45 in 1972. She uses the life of Joseph Stilwell, the military attache to China in 1935-39 and commander of United States forces and allied chief of staff to Chiang Kai-shek in 1942-44, to explore the history of China from the revolution of 1911 to the turmoil of World War II, when China's Nationalist government faced attack from Japanese invaders and Communist insurgents. Her story is an account of both American relations with China and the experiences of one of our men on the ground. In the cantankerous but level-headed "Vinegar Joe," Tuchman found a subject who allowed her to perform, in the words of The National Review, "one of the historian's most envied magic acts: conjoining a fine biography of a man with a fascinating epic story."
  

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Well-researched and well-written. - Goodreads
But, the high-quality writing keeps me going. - Goodreads
Tuchman's writing is both meticulousl - Goodreads

Review: Stilwell and the American Experience in China, 1911-45

User Review  - Joe Boylan - Goodreads

Stillwell is one of World War II s greatest generals who understood the corruption and weakness of Chiang's government. The final lines of the book are powerful! Read full review

Review: Stilwell and the American Experience in China, 1911-45

User Review  - Riley - Goodreads

An account of General Joseph Stilwell and the Nationalist China that he vainly tried to save. This book gives a good rendition of the illusions that America held over China and the bankrupt rule of ... Read full review

Contents

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About the author (2001)

Barbara W. Tuchman achieved prominence as a historian with "The Zimmermann Telegram "and international fame with "The Guns of August," which won the Pulitzer Prize. There followed five more books: "The Proud Tower," "Stilwell and the American Experience in China" (also awarded the Pulitzer Prize), "A Distant Mirror," "Practicing History," and "The March of Folly," "The First Salute" was Mrs. Tuchman's last book before her death in February 1989.

"From the Paperback edition.

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