Car guide to Jersey & Guernsey

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1883
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Page 47 - Six may be visited in succession at all times except near high-water — some are connected by low natural vaults, but most of them are detached. The height in the interior of the caverns varies, rarely exceeding 20 feet. The floors of these caves are strewn with a curious mixture of blocks of white granite and large perfectly rounded pebbles, while the walls are of pink and dark grey granite. Small cascades and pinnacles of rock, and occasional wide expanses of smooth white sand, complete the scene....
Page 2 - ... Gen. Sir John Doyle; it is 96 feet high, with its summit 384 feet above the level of high water. Another remarkable object is the Victoria Tower, 100 feet high, and its summit 301 feet above high water, erected on the heights above St. Peter Port to commemorate the visit of Her Majesty Queen Victoria in 1846. It is a square tower, slightly tapering from its base, surmounted by a battlemented gallery, with square turrets at its angles. The island of Guernsey is nearly in the form of a right-angled...
Page 41 - ... every side seen meeting the sea ; the fine curves of several of the bays may be distinctly traced, with their martello towers and other more imposing defences ; several of the larger valleys may be distinguished by the shadow which is thrown upon one side; while all around the horizon is bounded by the blue sea, excepting towards the east, where the French coast is seen, stretching in a wide curve towards the...
Page 3 - St Saviour, St Andrew, St Martin, Forest, St Peter du Bois, and Torteval. The administration is under the supervision of a lieutenant-governor appointed by the crown; and the parliamentary assembly consists of a bailiff, twelve jurats, a procureur or attorney-general, the beneficed clergy, a.nd twelve delegates elected by the people. Taxation is very light, and the annual revenue amounts to about 10,000. Ecclesiastically the island is a deanery of the Winchester diocese of the Church of England....
Page 47 - Langon is the succession of caverns and narrow fiords, alternating with rocky reefs projecting for some distance into the sea. These are continued beyond the lowest tide, reaching indeed to the extremity of Grosnez, under which is a cave. The number of caverns it is difficult to estimate. Six may be visited in succession at all times except near high-water — some are connected by low natural vaults, but most of them are detached.
Page 3 - London, 1878, it consists geologically of three very unequal portions, one characterized by a very felspathic syenite and gneiss, another by a hornblendic "granital," and a third by a micaceous syenite.
Page 2 - BOYS, or BOIS, John, one of the translators of the Bible, in the reign of James I., was...
Page 18 - King, as a proof of his Royal affection towards the Island of Jersey, in which he was twice received in safety when he was excluded from the remainder of his dominions...
Page 40 - Hambye, she poured forth her sorrows in prayer to Him whose ear is ever open to the cry of the afflicted mourner (see page 57).
Page 40 - Jersey appears like an extensive pleasure-ground — one immense park, thickly studded with trees, beautifully undulating, and dotted with cottages. Fertility is on every side seen meeting the sea ; the fine curves of several of the bays may be distinctly traced, with their martello towers and other more imposing defences ; several of the larger valleys may be distinguished by the shadow which is thrown upon one side; while all around the horizon is bounded by the blue sea, excepting towards the...

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