Human Adaptation in the Asian Palaeolithic: Hominin Dispersal and Behaviour During the Late Quaternary

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 27, 2012 - History - 372 pages
This book examines the first human colonization of Asia and particularly the tropical environments of Southeast Asia during the Upper Pleistocene. In studying the unique character of the Asian archaeological record, it reassesses long-accepted propositions about the development of human 'modernity.' Ryan J. Rabett reveals an evolutionary relationship between colonization, the challenges encountered during this process - especially in relation to climatic and environmental change - and the forms of behaviour that emerged. This book argues that human modernity is not something achieved in the remote past in one part of the world, but rather is a diverse, flexible, responsive, and ongoing process of adaptation.
 

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Contents

The Journey East OOOOOOO kvwltlt
1
The Pleistocene Planet
8
Hominin Dispersal beyond Africa during the Lower
25
Regional Trajectories in Modern Human Behaviour
68
The Initial Upper Pleistocene Dispersal of Homo sapiens
85
Climate Dispersal and Technological Change during the Last
142
Tropical Subsistence Strategies at the End of the Last Glacial
208
Ex Levis Terra
266
Appendix
291
Bibliography
307
Index
361
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About the author (2012)

Ryan J. Rabett is a Research Fellow at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge. His research focuses on archaeological sites in Asia and since 2007 he has been the director of a major project in northern Vietnam. He is the author of more than forty articles, which primarily focus on prehistoric subsistence and technological strategies in Asia.

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