Celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the incorporation of Billerica, Massachusetts, May 29th, 1855: including the proceedings of the committee, address, poem, and other exercises of the occasion ; with an appendix

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S.J. Varney, 1855 - Billerica (Mass.) - 152 pages
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Page 24 - That the selectmen of every town in the several precincts and quarters where they dwell, shall have a vigilant eye over their brethren and neighbors, to see, first, that none of them shall suffer so much barbarism in any of their families, as not to endeavor to teach by themselves or others, their children and apprentices so much learning, as may enable them perfectly to read the English tongue, and knowledge of the capital laws, upon penalty of twenty shillings for each neglect therein...
Page 142 - He was so near me that my clothes were besmeared with his blood and brains, which I wiped off in some degree with a handful of fresh earth. The sight was so shocking to many of the men, that they left their posts and ran to view him. I ordered them back, but in vain. I then ordered him to be buried instantly.
Page 124 - ... veneration for our forefathers, and of love for our posterity. They form the connecting links between the selfish and the social passions. By the fundamental principle of Christianity, the happiness of the individual is interwoven, by innumerable and imperceptible ties, with that of his contemporaries: by the power of filial reverence and parental affection, individual existence is extended beyond the limits of individual life, and the happiness of every age is chained in mutual dependence upon...
Page 41 - ... and inured to the difficulties of a strange land ; the people are industrious and frugal. We are knit together as a body in a most sacred covenant of the Lord, of the violation whereof we make great conscience, and by virtue whereof we hold ourselves straitly tied to all care of each other's good, and of the whole. It is not with us as with men whom small things can discourage.
Page 23 - By the terms of the act, the selectmen of every town were required to "have a vigilant eye over their brethren and neighbors, — to see first that none of them shall suffer so much barbarism in any of their families, as not to endeavor to teach, by themselves or others, their children and apprentices, so much learning, as may enable them perfectly to read the English tongue, and [obtain a] knowledge of the capital laws...
Page 125 - Man, therefore, was not made for himself alone. No; he was made for his country, by the obligations of the social compact: he was made for his species, by the Christian duties of universal charity : he was made for all ages past, by the sentiment of reverence for his forefathers ; and he was made for all future times, by the impulse of affection for his progeny. Under the influence of these principles, "Existence sees him spurn her bounded reign.
Page 124 - Among the sentiments of most powerful operation upon the human heart, and most highly honorable to the human character, are those of veneration for our forefathers, and of love for our posterity. They form the connecting links between the selfish and the social passions. By the fundamental principle of Christianity, the happiness of the individual is interwoven, by innumerable and imperceptible ties, with that of his contemporaries: by the power of filial reverence...
Page 40 - ... of all who were born into the world, more than two in ten, full four in nineteen, attained the age of seventy. Of those who lived beyond ninety, the proportion, as compared with European tables of longevity, was still more remarkable. I have dwelt the longer on the character of the early Puritans of New England, for they are the parents of one-third the whole white population of the United States.
Page 40 - As Ireland will not brook venomous beasts, so will not that land vile livers." One might dwell there " from year to year, and not see a drunkard, or hear an oath, or meet a beggar.
Page 41 - Heaven and earth seemed never to have agreed better to frame a place for man's commodious and delightful habitation.

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