Designing Interaction: Psychology at the Human-Computer Interface

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John Millar Carroll, J. Long
CUP Archive, Jun 28, 1991 - Computers - 333 pages
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Designing Interaction, first published in 1991, presents a broadbased and fundamental re-examination of human-computer interaction as a practical and scientific endeavor. The chapters in this well-integrated, tightly focused book are by psychologists and computer scientists in industry and academia, who examine the relationship between contemporary psychology and human-computer interaction. HCI seeks to produce user interfaces that facilitate and enrich human motivation, action and experience; but to do so deliberately it must also incorporate means of understanding user interfaces in human terms - the province of psychology. Conversely, the design and use of computing equipment provides psychologists with a diverse and challenging empirical field in which to assess their theories and methodologies.
 

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Contents

Cognitive Artifacts Donald A Norman
17
Some Remarks on the TheoryPractice Gap
39
A Position Paper on the Role of Cognitive
60
The TaskArtifact Cycle John M Carroll
74
Bridging between Basic Theories and the Artifacts
103
Interface Problems and Interface Resources Stephen J Payne
128
Inner and Outer Theory in HumanCcmputer Interaction
154
The Role of German Work Psychology in the Design
203
Encountering Artifacts in Use
227
A Development Perspective on Interface Design
254
Supporting Effective
269
Perspectives on Methodology in HCI Research
286
Index
315
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