Soldiers, Spies and Statesmen: Egypt's Road to Revolt

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Verso Books, Nov 13, 2012 - History - 303 pages
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Gripping analysis of Egypt’s transformation from military regime to police state, on the road to revolution.

Revolutions are difficult to understand and almost impossible to predict. Egypt’s 2011 revolt was no exception. The military’s abandonment of Mubarak—a turning point for the revolt—confounded many observers, who assumed that the leader and the generals stood or fell together. The officers, it was thought, ruled from behind the scenes and simply swapped the figures in the spotlight to preserve the status quo.

In a challenge to this conventional view, Hazem Kandil presents the revolution as the latest episode in an ongoing power struggle between the three components of Egypt’s authoritarian regime: the military, the security services, and the political apparatus. A detailed study of the interactions within this invidious triangle over six decades of war, conspiracy, and sociopolitical transformation, Soldiers, Spies, and Statesmen is the first systematic analysis of how Egypt metamorphosed from a military into a police state—and what that means for the future of its revolution.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The March 1954 Crisis
15
The Road to June 1967
43
The Corrective
99
October 1973 and Its Discontents
113
Revolt
175
The Military After the Revolt
221
Acknowledgments
245
Bibliography
273
Index
293
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About the author (2012)

Hazem Kandil is a Lecturer in Sociology and St. Catharine's College Fellow at Cambridge University. He has also taught at the American University in Cairo and the University of California, Los Angeles.

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