Journal of a Tour from Boston to Oneida, June, 1796

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John Wilson and Son, University Press, 1882 - Oneida Indians - 32 pages
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Page 32 - Whites-town ........ 46 - 102 Here the stage ends. From Whites-town to Fort Stanwix is a wagon-road, and wagons may be hired ............. 12 Fort Stanwix is situate on the upper waters of Mohawk River, from which is a portage to Wood Creek, where a Canal is now making ................ 2 Thence by water, down Wood Creek to Oneida Lake 27 Across Oneida Lake to Fort Bruington .... 35 Down the river to Oswego Falls ...... 12 Portage 150 feet.
Page 31 - ... and dust and jolting fifty-two miles. NB At Belchertown observed in the house of Captain Warner an aqueduct which brought water from three quarters of a mile distance into every part of his house, particularly into the kitchen and barroom ; and an overshot wheel was carried round by it which turned the spit. These aqueducts are very common along the road, and show great ingenuity, as well as a spirit of enterprise in our citizens. . . . Wednesday, July 6. At three this morning set off in the...
Page 7 - Tho water is brought in pipes from springs in the hills and fields to the roadside, and there conducted to troughs or tubs for watering cattle. At one place there was a tube and reservoir which went to the top of a house, and must be serviceable in case of fire. This was Quintin's inn at Ware.* It is also very agreeable to observe the number of new meetinghouses and schoolhouses, as well as dwelling-houses, along the road, and the show of elegance in ornament and painting which appears in them. We...
Page 6 - Life," pp. 347-362. ish in number, as other tribes ; to prevent which they have encouraged early marriages, and have made it a strict regulation that the squaws shall drink no rum till they are past child-bearing. They are frequently obliged to delay marriage a long time for want of a priest, and in some instances travel as far as Quebec to be married ; yet there are scarcely any instances of incontinence, and no illegitimate children. As they have been for above a century converted to the popish...
Page 31 - He had been in to wash himself. The people had got him in a blanket on the ground, with his face downward, and had sent for a barrel on which to roll him, and a quantity of salt to rub him. I came to the spot just in time to prevent his being rolled and salted, and got him into a house, where I directed him to be carried upstairs and laid on a bed. I had him wiped clean and dry, placed him in a proper position, and blowed into his mouth. They sent for a doctor, and I gave them my advice to keep on...
Page 8 - One man told us it was also good manure for corn, and that he has frequently put a shovel full of it into hills of corn instead of dung. June 12. Kept Sabbath at Pittsfield, and preached for Mr. Allen, PM He has been settled here thirty-two years. At the time of his settlement and for some years after, the lands hereabouts were the hunting-ground of the Stockbridge Indians, full of deer and other game, which cultivation lias gradually destroyed.
Page 22 - ... two hours, and had several examinations, which we minuted in writing. A tin kettle of water and a small tin cup served us for refreshment during the conference.* This village is situate on a high plain ; and Skanandogh's house, on the south edge of it, commands an extensive and grand view all rouud. Were the country in a state of cultivation, nothing could be more charming than such a prospect ; but it is melancholy to see so fine a tract of land in such a savage state.
Page 23 - Power, which had a superin tendency over human affairs.* To this invisible Power he addressed his devotions, and depended on it for success in hunting and in war. This had been his religion from his youth, and he had never failed of receiving answers to his prayers. He had always either killed his enemy or made him captive, and had generally good luck in hunting. Others, he said, paid the same devotion to the wind and to the thunder, believing them to be invisible powers, and put the same trust in...
Page 23 - Power he addressed his devotions, and depended on it for success in hunting and in war. This had been his religion from his youth, and he had never failed of receiving answers to his prayers. He had always either killed his enemy or made him captive, and had generally good luck in hunting. Others, he said, paid the same devotion to the wind and to the thunder, believing them to be invisible powers, and put the same trust in them as he did in the rocks and mountains; and he regarded the Oneida stone...
Page 6 - Company in the stage very entertaining and instructive : Dr. Shepard, of Northampton, Captain Park Holland, of Belchertown, and Mr. Biglow, of Petersham, all members of the General Court, returning home. Captain Holland has been a surveyor of Eastern lands, and is well acquainted with the country and tribe of Penobscot. He says the Indians there amount to three hundred and twenty in number. He has an exact list of the names of each family, and they average at four and a half to a family. They are...

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