Charles Peirce's Pragmatic Pluralism

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1994 - Philosophy - 177 pages
This work runs counter to the traditional interpretations of Peirce's philosophy by eliciting an inherent strand of pragmatic pluralism that is embedded in the very core of his thought and that weaves his various doctrines into a systematic pattern of pluralism. Rosenthal gives a new design to the seeming bedrock of Peirce's position: convergence toward the final ultimate opinion of the community of interpreters in the idealized long run. Focusing frequently on passages from Peirce's writings which have been virtually ignored in the more traditional interpretations of his work, this book shows the way in which Peirce's position, far from lying in opposition to the Kuhnian interpretation of science, provides strong and much needed metaphysical and epistemic underpinnings for it in a way which avoids the pitfalls of false alternatives offered by the philosophical tradition. The book examines in depth the various features of Peirce's position that enter into these underpinnings. Among the topics explored are meaning, truth, perception, world, sign relations, realism, categorical inquiry, phenomenology, temporality, and speculative metaphysics. -- Back cover.
 

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Contents

World Truth and Science
1
Meaning as Habit
21
Habit Temporality and Pences Proofs of Realism
63
Pragmatic Experimentalism and the Derivation of the Categories
77
Fences Pragmatic Metaphysics The Foundation for Pluralism
97
ENDNOTES
129
BIBLIOGRAPHY OF WORKS CITED
163
INDEX
171
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Sandra B. Rosenthal is Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University. She is co-author, with Patrick L. Bourgeois, of Mead and Merleau-Ponty, also published by SUNY Press, and author of Speculative Pragmatism.

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