Japan in World History

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Oxford University Press, Feb 4, 2010 - History - 176 pages
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Japan in World History ranges from Japan's prehistoric interactions with Korea and China, to the Western challenge of the late 1500s, the partial isolation under the Tokugawa family (1600-1868), and the tumultuous interactions of more recent times, when Japan modernized ferociously, turned imperialist, lost a world war, then became the world's second largest economy--and its greatest foreign aid donor. Writing in a lively fashion, Huffman makes rich use of primary sources, illustrating events with comments by the people who lived through them: tellers of ancient myths, court women who dominated the early literary world, cynical priests who damned medieval materialism, travelers who marveled at "indecent" Western ballroom dancers in the mid-1800s, and the emperor who justified Pearl Harbor. Without ignoring standard political and military events, the book illuminates economic, social, and cultural factors; it also examines issues of gender as well as the roles of commoners, samurai, business leaders, novelists, and priests.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER 1 Before the Brush to 645 CE
1
Rule by Law and Taste 6451160
19
The Long Rise 11601550
37
CHAPTER 4 PeaceAnd Its Benefits 15501850
55
CHAPTER 5 The Nation Transformed 18501905
72
CHAPTER 6 Engaging the World for Good and for Ill 19051945
91
CHAPTER 7 A New Kind of Power after 1945
109
Chronology
129
Notes
131
Further Reading
139
Websites
143
Acknowledgments
145
Index
147
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About the author (2010)

James L. Huffman is H. Orth Hirt Professor of History Emeritus at Wittenberg University.

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