The Honey-moon, Volumes 1-2

Front Cover
E.L. Carey and A. Hart, 1837 - English fiction
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 94 - Each evidently thought that they asked little in not demanding an equal share of my luxuries and fortune; but they were all in difficulty — all needed large assistance — all depended on me. Lastly, my own sister Susan appealed to me — but hers was the most moderate request of all — she only wished for twenty pounds. I gave it her at once from my own purse. As soon as I saw my mother I explained to her my difficulties. She told me that she expected this, and that it broke her heart: I must...
Page 60 - Purple the sails, and so perfumed that The winds were love-sick: with them the oars were silver; "Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made The water, which they beat, to follow faster, As amorous of their strokes. For her own person, It...
Page 93 - ... comforts of life as myself, or even as my husband. My charities, they were called— they seemed to me the payment of my debts to my fellow-creatures — were abundant. Lord Reginald peremptorily checked them ; but as I had a large allowance for my own expenses, I denied myself a thousand luxuries to which it appeared to me I had no right, for the sake of feeding the hungry. Nor was it only that charity impelled me, but that I could not acquire a taste for spending money on myself — I disliked...
Page 95 - ... refusal. I dared not communicate it. The menaces of bankruptcy ; the knowledge that he had instilled false hopes into so many; the fears of disgrace rendered my father, always rough, absolutely ferocious. Life flickered in my dear mother's frame ; it seemed on the point of expiring when she heard my father's step ; if he came in with a smooth brow, her pale lips wreathed into her own sweet smile, and a delicate pink tinged her fallen cheeks ; if he scowled, and his voice was high, every limb...
Page 91 - My wedding day came. My mother kissed me fondly, my father blessed me with pride and joy, my sisters stood round, radiant with delight. There was but one drawback to the universal happiness — that immediately on my marriage I was to go abroad. From the church door I stepped into the carriage. Having once and again been folded in my dear mother's embrace, the wheels were in motion, and we were away. I looked out from the window; there was the dear...
Page 62 - The old woman that showed the place had something in her of the picturesque, — aged, and wrinkled, and hideous ; — with her hard hand impatiently stretched out for the petty coin which was to pay for admission to the spot ; — she suited well with all the rest. She increased the pathos that belongs to the deserted sanctuary. How little could she feel that nothing in Verona was so precious to the
Page 142 - The ardent vow that ne'er can fail, The sigh that is not sad, The glance that tells a secret tale, The spirit hushed, yet glad; These weave the dream that maidens prove, The fluttering dream of virgin love. Sleep on, sweet maid, nor sigh to break The spell that binds thy brain, Nor struggle from thy trance to wake To life's impending pain ; Who wakes to love, awake but knows Love is a dream without repose.
Page 66 - Frederick bore her toward a sequestered villa we had previously remarked, while I almost flew up the path before him, to solicit assistance, until a sudden turn brought me beneath a verandah, and in presence of a young Greek lady. Never shall I forget the noble vision of loveliness which met my gaze, as I breathlessly explained, and apologized for, my intrusion. In all the majestic freshness of early womanhood, she was seated watching the slumber of a cherub boy, whose rounded cheek was pillowed...
Page 14 - Which is a necessary ingredient of all that is excellent," replied Schulembourg. Walstein shrugged his shoulders, and then invited the physician to be seated. " I wish to consult you, Dr. Schulembourg," he observed, somewhat abruptly. " My metaphysical opinions induce me to believe that a physician is the only philosopher. I am perplexed by my own case. I am in excellent health, my appetite is good, my digestion perfect. My temperament I have ever considered to be of a very sanguine character. I...
Page 27 - How is Sidonia, Madame de Schulembourg?' inquired Augusta. 'Oh, quite mad. He will not be sane this week. There is his last letter; read it, and return it to me when we meet. Adieu, Madame de Manheim; adieu, dear girls; do not stay long: adieu, adieu.

Bibliographic information