Nietzsche: Volumes Three and Four: Volumes Three and Four

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Harper Collins, Mar 1, 1991 - Biography & Autobiography - 612 pages
3 Reviews
A landmark discussion between two great thinkers--the second (combining volumes III and IV) of two volumes inquiring into the central issues of Friedrich Nietzsche's philosophy.
 

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User Review  - thoughtcorner - LibraryThing

The culmination of Heidegger's Nietzsche courses is the final lecture on Nihilism. Though Heidegger's courses of the 30's are structurally different from those of the 20's, none of them exhibit the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - thoughtcorner - LibraryThing

Along with the Contributions, the Nietzsche books are my favorites. They are huge and require complete attention. His Nazi period strikes me as his most vigorous and during this period Heidegger very ... Read full review

Contents

Tracing the Opposition of the True and Apparent Worlds Back to Relations of Value
57
World and Life as Becoming
64
Knowing as Schematizing a Chaos in Accordance with Practical Need
68
The Concept of Chaos
77
Practical Need as the Need for a Schema Formation of a Horizon and Perspective
84
Accordance and Calculation
90
The Poetizing Essence of Reason
94
Nietzsches Biological Interpretation of Knowledge
101
Aristotle
111
Apparent Worlds
123
The Uttermost Transformation of Metaphysically
131
Justice
235
Analysis by David Farrell Krell
255
Glossary
277
begins following page
288
The Essential Determination of Man and the Essence
139
Being as A Priori 159
159
The Interpretation of Being as Idea and Valuative
173
Being as the Void and as Abundance 188
188
Analysis by David Farrell Krell 253
253
Glossary
295
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Page 135 - ... car elles m'ont fait voir qu'il est possible de parvenir à des connaissances qui soient fort utiles à la vie ; et qu'au lieu de cette philosophie spéculative qu'on enseigne dans les écoles, on en peut trouver une pratique par laquelle, connaissant la force et les actions du feu, de l'eau, de l'air, des astres, des cieux et de tous les autres corps qui nous environnent, aussi distinctement que nous connaissons les divers métiers de nos artisans, nous les pourrions employer en même façon...
Page 253 - Take but Degree away, untune that string, And, hark, what discord follows ! each thing meets In mere oppugnancy. The bounded waters Should lift their bosoms higher than the shores, And make a sop of all this solid globe. Strength should be lord of imbecility, And the rude son should strike his father dead : Force should be right ; or, rather, right and wrong (Between whose endless jar justice resides) Should lose their names, and so should justice, too. Then everything includes itself in power :...
Page 190 - Über allen Gipfeln Ist Ruh, In allen Wipfeln Spürest du Kaum einen Hauch; Die Vögelein schweigen im Walde. Warte nur, balde Ruhest du auch.
Page 281 - The orchestra whirls me wider than Uranus flies, It wrenches such ardors from me I did not know I possess'd them, It sails me, I dab with bare feet, they are lick'd by the indolent waves, I am cut by bitter and angry hail, I lose my breath, Steep'd amid...
Page 135 - ... practical philosophy by means of which, knowing the force and the action of fire, water, air, the stars, the heavens and all other bodies that environ us, as distinctly as we know the different crafts of our artisans, we can in the same way employ them in all those uses to which they are adapted, and thus render ourselves the masters and possessors of nature.
Page 135 - For they caused me to see that it is possible to attain knowledge which is very useful in life, and that, instead of that speculative philosophy which is taught in the schools, we may find a practical philosophy by means of which, knowing the force and the action of fire, water, air, the stars, heavens and all other bodies that environ us, as distinctly as we know the different crafts of our artisans, we can in the same way employ them in all those uses to which they are adapted, and thus render...
Page 217 - Behold, I teach you the overman. The overman is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the overman shall be the meaning of the earth!
Page 293 - ... beyond the line." The place we inhabit, wherever we are, is always this inbetween zone, place of host and parasite, neither inside nor outside. It is a region of the Unheimlich, beyond any formalism, which reforms itself wherever we are, if we know where we are. This "place" is where we are, in whatever text, in the...

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About the author (1991)

Born in southern Germany, Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) is the author of Being and Time. He taught philosophy at the University of Freiburg and the University of Marburg.