Ma Dear's Aprons

Front Cover
Aladdin Paperbacks, Jan 1, 2000 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
6 Reviews
Young David Earl always knows what day of the week it is because his mother, Ma Dear, has a different apron for every day except Sunday -- when they can set aside some special no-work time, just for themselves.

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Review: Ma Dear's Aprons

User Review  - Rachel Dalton - Goodreads

This is a beautiful book that addresses the struggles of an African American single mother and her son in what appears to be the 19th century. It would be great to use for working on character ... Read full review

Review: Ma Dear's Aprons

User Review  - Goodreads

This is a beautiful book that addresses the struggles of an African American single mother and her son in what appears to be the 19th century. It would be great to use for working on character ... Read full review

About the author (2000)

Patricia C. McKissack was born on August 9, 1944 in Smyrna, Tennessee. She received a bachelor's degree of arts in English from Tennessee State University in 1964 and a master's degree in early childhood literature and media programming from Webster University in 1975. After college, she worked as a junior high English teacher and a children's book editor. Since the 1980's, she and her husband Frederick L. McKissack have written over 100 books together. Most of their titles are biographies with a strong focus on African-American themes for young readers. Their early 1990s biography series, Great African Americans included volumes on Frederick Douglass, Marian Anderson, and Paul Robeson. Their other works included Black Hands, White Sails: The Story of African-American Whalers and Days of Jubilee: The End of Slavery in the United States. Over their 30 years of writing together, the couple won many awards including the C.S. Lewis Silver Medal, the Coretta Scott King Award for Christmas in the Big House, Christmas in the Quarters, the Jane Addams Peace Award, and the 1998 Virginia Hamilton Award for making a contribution to the field of multicultural literature for children and adolescents, as well as the NAACP Image Award for Sojourner Truth: Ain't I a Woman?. She also writes fiction on her own. She won the 1993 Newberry Honor Book Award for The Dark Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural and the Caldecott Medal for Mirandy and Brother Wind.

Floyd Cooper received a Coretta Scott King Award for his illustrations in The Blacker the Berry and a Coretta Scott King Honor for his illustrations in Brown Honey in Broomwheat Tea and I Have Heard of a Land. Born and raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Mr. Cooper received a degree in fine arts from the University of Oklahoma and, after graduating, worked as an artist for a major greeting card company. In 1984 he came to New York City to pursue a career as an illustrator of books and now lives in Easton, Pennsylvania, with his wife and children.

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