Computerization Movements and Technology Diffusion: From Mainframes to Ubiquitous Computing

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Margaret S. Elliott, Kenneth L. Kraemer
Information Today, Inc., 2008 - Business & Economics - 581 pages
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Computerization movement (CM), as first articulated by Rob Kling, refers to a special kind of social and technological movement that promotes the adoption of computing within organizations and society. Here, editors Margaret S. Elliott and Kenneth L. Kraemer and more than two dozen noted scholars trace the successes and failures of CMs from the mainframe and PC eras to the current Internet era and the emerging era of ubiquitous computing. Through theoretical analyses, systematic empirical studies, field-based studies, and case studies of specific technologies, the book shows CMs to be driven by Utopian visions of technology that become part of the ether within society, creating a general bias in favor of computing adoption. The empirical studies presented here show the need for designers, users, and the media to be aware that CM rhetoric can propose grand visions that never become part of a reality, and reinforce the need for critical and scholarly review of promising new technologies.
 

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Contents

Computerization Movements
3
Reprints of Seminal Research Papers
43
Productivity
93
The Computerization Movement in
115
Visions of the Next Big Thing Computerization
145
Framing the Photographs Understanding
173
From the Computerization Movement
203
Internetworking in the Small
225
InformationCommunications Rights as
337
Examining the Success of Computerization
359
Emerging Patterns of Intersection
381
Seeking Reliability in Freedom
405
Movement Ideology vs User Pragmatism
427
The Professionals Everyday Struggle
455
Politics of Design NextGeneration
481
Social Movements Shaping the Internet
499

Online Communities Infrastructure Relational
239
Virtual Teams HighTech Rhetoric
263
LargeScale Distributed Collaboration
289
Examining the Proliferation of Intranets
311
Comparative Perspective on Computerization
521
About the Contributors
547
Index
561
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