The history of the decline and fall of the Roman empire, Volume 10

Front Cover
Printed for W. Allason, 1820 - Byzantine Empire
8 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
3
3 stars
3
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Benedict8 - LibraryThing

No I have not read the whole thing. About a quarter of it. It features spectacular English and wonderful irony. It is long, but not boring by any means. I learned more about how religion operates in ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JeremyPreacher - LibraryThing

I have not read more than the occasional passage from this, nor do I really expect to. It's a big chunk of book, though, and it's an old enough edition that it smells lovely. Read full review

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 23 - A victorious line of march had been prolonged above a thousand miles from the rock of Gibraltar to the banks of the Loire ; the repetition of an equal space would have carried the Saracens to the confines of Poland and the highlands of Scotland : the Rhine is not more impassable than the Nile or Euphrates, and the Arabian fleet might have sailed without a naval combat into the mouth of the Thames.
Page 162 - ... the dignity or promote the happiness of mankind. Not a single idea has been added to the speculative systems of antiquity, and a succession of patient disciples became in their turn the dogmatic teachers of the next servile generation. Not a single composition of history, philosophy, or literature, has been saved from oblivion by the intrinsic beauties of style or sentiment, of original fancy, or even of successful imitation.
Page 37 - HIGH on a throne of royal state, which far Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind, Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand Showers on her kings barbaric pearl and gold...
Page 40 - have now reigned above fifty years in victory or peace : beloved by " my subjects, dreaded by my enemies, and respected by my allies. " Riches and honours, power and pleasure, have waited on my call, " nor does any earthly blessing appear to have been wanting to my " felicity. In this situation I have diligently numbered the days of " pure and genuine happiness which have fallen to my lot : they amount " to FOURTEEN : — O man ! place not thy confidence in this present
Page 158 - By the confession even of priestly hatred, no art or science, except poetry, was foreign to this universal scholar, who was deep in thought, indefatigable in reading, and eloquent in diction.
Page 359 - Carizmian, drawing a dagger, rushed headlong towards the throne : the guards raised their battle-axes ; their zeal was checked by Alp Arslan, the most skilful archer of the age ; he drew his bow, but his foot slipped, the arrow glanced aside, and he received in his breast the dagger of Joseph, who was instantly cut in pieces. The wound was mortal ; and the Turkish prince bequeathed a dying admonition to the pride of kings. "In my youth...
Page 18 - It came flying through the air, says Joinville, like a winged long-tailed dragon, about the thickness of a hogshead, with the report of thunder and the velocity of lightning; and the darkness of the night was dispelled by this deadly illumination.
Page 51 - The philosophers of Athens and Rome enjoyed the blessings and asserted the rights of civil and religious freedom. Their moral and political writings might have gradually unlocked the fetters of Eastern despotism, diffused a liberal spirit of inquiry and toleration, and encouraged the Arabian sages to suspect that their caliph was a tyrant, and their Prophet an impostor.
Page 190 - The chain of authority was broken, which restrains the bigot from thinking as he pleases, and the slave from speaking as he thinks: the popes, fathers, and councils, were no longer the supreme and infallible judges of the world; and each Christian was taught to acknowledge no law but the Scriptures, no interpreter but his own conscience.
Page 370 - Constantinople; and the divinity of Christ was denied and derided in the same temple in which it had been pronounced by the first general synod of the Catholics.

Bibliographic information