Life, Adventures, and Travels in California

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Blakeman & Company, 1857 - California - 468 pages
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Page 429 - Mexico ; thence, westwardly, along the whole southern boundary of New Mexico (which runs north of the town called Paso) to its western termination ; thence northward along the western line of New Mexico, until it intersects the first branch of the river Gila...
Page 346 - ... the former owner, if inclined to be rascally, can reclaim his property." CHAPTER XX. Los Presidios. — Los Missiones. — Los Pueblos. — Harbors. — Inhabitants. — Meztizos. — Whites. THE Presidios of the Californias art: fortresses occupied by a few troops under the command of a military prefect. These posts were originally established for several purposes; one was, the national occupancy of the country ; another, the protection of the Missions against the insurrections of the Indians...
Page 464 - N. 51 E. As soon as I had gratified the first feelings of curiosity, I descended, and each man ascended in his turn; for I would only allow one at a time to mount the unstable and precarious slab, which it seemed a breath would hurl into the abyss below. We mounted the barometer in the snow of the summit, and, fixing a ramrod in a crevice, unfurled the national flag to wave in the breeze where never flag waved before.
Page 306 - They are usually fitted out by private individuals. The Armador or owner commands them. Crews are shipped to work them, and from forty to fifty Indians, called Busos, to dive for the oyster. A stock of provisions and spirits, a small sum of money...
Page 437 - Missouri in 1838-39, and formed the first settlement in the valley, on a large grant of land which he obtained from the Mexican Government. He had, at first, some trouble with the Indians; but, by the occasional exercise of well-timed authority, he has succeeded in converting them into a peaceable and industrious people.
Page 444 - ... give little idea of the terrors of the bar of the Columbia : all who have seen it have spoken of the wildness of the scene, and the incessant roar of the waters, representing it as one of the most fearful sights that can possibly meet the eye of the sailor. The difficulty of its channel, the distance of the leading sailing marks, their uncertainty to one unacquainted with them, the want of knowledge of the strength and direction of the currents, with the necessity of approaching close to unseen...
Page 444 - Mere description can give little idea of the terrors of the bar of the Columbia : all who have seen it have spoken of the wildness of the scene, and the incessant roar of the waters, representing it as one of the most fearful sights that can possibly meet the eye of the sailor.
Page 62 - On the neighboring plains he herded large bands of horses, mules and cattle. To this fine old fellow Alvarado made known his peril and designs ; whereupon the foreigners assembled at Graham's summons, elected him their captain, an Englishman by the name of Coppinger, lieutenant, and repaired to San Juan. A council was held between the clerk and the foreigners. The former promised, that if by the aid of the latter he should successfully defend himself against the acting governor, and obtain possession...
Page 285 - The Religion shall be the Roman Catholic Apostolic, without admitting the exercise of any other ; but the government will not molest any persons for their particular religious opinions. 4th. A Constitution shall regulate all the branches of the Administration " provisionally," in conformity as much as possible with the expressed declaration.
Page 302 - The mean range of temperature in the whole country in the summer season is from 60 to 74 Fahrenheit. The rains fall in the winter months ; are very severe, and of short duration. During the remainder of the year the air is dry and clear ; and the sky more beautiful than the imagination can conceive. The range of mountains occupying the whole interior of this country, vary in height from one to five thousand feet above the level of the sea. They are almost bare of all verdure, mere brown piles...

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