Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Dec 13, 2011 - History - 736 pages
68 Reviews

This "masterful treatment of one of the most complex periods of American history" (New Republic) made history when it was originally published in 1988. It redefined how Reconstruction was viewed by historians and people everywhere in its chronicling of how Americans -- black and white -- responded to the unprecedented changes unleashed by the war and the end of slavery. This "smart book of enormous strengths" (Boston Globe) has since gone on to become the classic work on the wrenching post-Civil War period -- an era whose legacy reverberates still today in the United States.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
38
4 stars
22
3 stars
6
2 stars
2
1 star
0

Review: Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution 1863-1877 (The New American Nation Series)

User Review  - Richard Lesses - Goodreads

Superb (if occasionally dry). Places reconstruction fully in the context of its time and place, not as an isolated series of events happening only in the South. Explains different impact of ... Read full review

Review: Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution 1863-1877 (The New American Nation Series)

User Review  - Drew Maliniak - Goodreads

Excellent but dense. Read full review

All 17 reviews »

Contents

The World the War Made
1
Rehearsals for Reconstruction
35
The Meaning of Freedom
77
Ambiguities of Free Labor
124
The Failure of Presidential Reconstruction
176
The Making of Radical Reconstruction
228
Blueprints for a Republican South
281
Political and Economic
346
The Challenge of Enforcement
412
The Reconstruction of the North
460
The Politics of Depression
512
Redemption and After
564
The River Has Its Bend
602
Selected Bibliography
615
Index
643
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Eric Foner is DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University and the author of several books. In 2006 he received the Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching at Columbia University. He has served as president of the Organization of American Historians, the American Historical Association, and the Society of American Historians. He lives in New York City.

Bibliographic information