Tales from Shakespear: Designed for the Use of Young Persons, Volume 1

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M. J. Godwin, at the Juvenile library, 1810
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Page 233 - With thy keen sword impress, as make me bleed: Let fall thy blade on vulnerable crests; I bear a charmed life , which must not yield To one of woman born.
Page 9 - Full fathom five thy father lies; Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes: Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange. Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell : Hark! now I hear them, — ding-dong, bell.
Page 20 - On the bat's back I do fly After summer merrily. Merrily, merrily shall I live now Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.
Page 143 - I hate him for he is a Christian, But more for that in low simplicity He lends out money gratis and brings down The rate of usance here with us in Venice. If I can catch him once upon the hip, I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
Page 223 - Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep,' the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleave* of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast,— Lady M, What do you mean ? Macb. Still it cried' Sleep no more !' to all the house ' Glamis hath murdered sleep, and therefore Cawdor Shall sleep no more; Macbeth shall sleep no more.
Page 49 - Hermione is chaste, Polixenes blameless, Camillo a true subject, Leontes a jealous tyrant, his innocent babe truly begotten ; and the king shall live •without an heir, if that, which is lost, be not found.
Page 101 - I thought that all things had been savage here, and therefore I put on the countenance of stern command ; but whatever men you are, that in this desert, under the shade of melancholy boughs, lose and neglect the creeping hours of time ; if ever you have looked on better days ; if ever you have...
Page 160 - That light we see is burning in my hall. How far that little candle throws his beams ! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.
Page 99 - When service should in my old limbs lie lame And unregarded age in corners thrown : Take that, and He that doth the ravens feed, Yea, providently caters for the sparrow, Be comfort to my age ! Here is the gold ; All this I give you.
Page 155 - Tarry a little ; there is something else. This bond doth give thee here no jot of blood, — The words expressly are, a pound of flesh...

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