moral and intellectual diversity of races

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Project Gutenberg, 1856
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Contents

I
13
II
105
III
114
IV
138
V
146
VI
172
VII
201
VIII
215
IX
246
X
272
XI
312
XII
336
XIII
368
XIV
391
XV
414
XVI
439

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Page 81 - Thou sawest till that a stone was cut out without hands, which smote the image upon his feet that were of iron and clay, and brake them to pieces.
Page 17 - The difference between the most dissimilar characters, between a philosopher and a common street porter, for example, seems to arise not so much from nature, as from habit, custom, and education.
Page 175 - The man Of virtuous soul commands not, nor obeys. Power, like a desolating pestilence, Pollutes whate'er it touches ; and obedience, Bane of all genius, virtue, freedom, truth, Makes slaves of men, and, of the human frame, A mechanized automaton.
Page 81 - This image's head was of fine gold, his breast and his arms of silver, his belly and his thighs of brass. His legs of iron, his feet part of iron and part of clay.
Page 255 - ... of the social system, and the expansion of the mind and faculties of man. Wherever the exterior condition of man becomes enlarged, quickened, and improved; wherever the intellectual nature of man distinguishes itself by its energy, brilliancy, and its grandeur; wherever these two signs concur, and they often do so, notwithstanding the gravest imperfections in the social system, there man proclaims and applauds civilization.
Page 281 - It is a most significant circumstance that no large society of which the tongue is not Teutonic has ever turned Protestant, and that, wherever a language derived from that of ancient Rome is spoken, the religion of modern Rome to this day prevails.
Page 77 - Society can only exist when a great number of men consider a great number of things in the same point of view ; when they hold the same opinions upon many subjects, and when the same occurrences suggest the same thoughts and impressions to their minds.
Page 387 - To a German mind the idea of a woman led into captivity is insupportable. In consequence of this prevailing sentiment, the states, which deliver as hostages the daughters of illustrious families, are bound by the most effectual obligation.
Page 14 - ... of the Bushman, where the lean and hungry savage crouches in silence like a beast of prey, watching with fixed eyes the birds which enter his pitfall, or the insects and reptiles which chance...
Page 318 - ... between the skulls of the several species of animals, but also those which are found to exist between different nations ; and it might be concluded that Nature has availed herself, at the same time, of this angle to mark out the diversities of the animal kingdom, and to establish a sort of scale from the inferior tribes up to the most beautiful forms which are found in the human species.

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