The Plague of Doves: A Novel

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Apr 29, 2008 - Fiction - 320 pages
48 Reviews

Louise Erdrich's mesmerizing new novel, her first in almost three years, centers on a compelling mystery. The unsolved murder of a farm family haunts the small, white, off-reservation town of Pluto, North Dakota. The vengeance exacted for this crime and the subsequent distortions of truth transform the lives of Ojibwe living on the nearby reservation and shape the passions of both communities for the next generation. The descendants of Ojibwe and white intermarry, their lives intertwine; only the youngest generation, of mixed blood, remains unaware of the role the past continues to play in their lives.

Evelina Harp is a witty, ambitious young girl, part Ojibwe, part white, who is prone to falling hopelessly in love. Mooshum, Evelina's grandfather, is a seductive storyteller, a repository of family and tribal history with an all-too-intimate knowledge of the violent past. Nobody understands the weight of historical injustice better than Judge Antone Bazil Coutts, a thoughtful mixed blood who witnesses the lives of those who appear before him, and whose own love life reflects the entire history of the territory. In distinct and winning voices, Erdrich's narrators unravel the stories of different generations and families in this corner of North Dakota. Bound by love, torn by history, the two communities' collective stories finally come together in a wrenching truth revealed in the novel's final pages.

The Plague of Doves is one of the major achievements of Louise Erdrich's considerable oeuvre, a quintessentially American story and the most complex and original of her books.

 

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The writing is beautiful. - Goodreads
The writing was rich and poetic. - Goodreads
... what amazing writing. - Goodreads

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kidzdoc - LibraryThing

This semi-autobiographical, semi-historical novel is set in the fictional town of Pluto, North Dakota, which sits on the edge of a Native American reservation and is dying a slow death due to its ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - William345 - LibraryThing

Extraordinary. Erdrich uses a succession of first-person narrators that dovetail with each other beautifully, la Faulkner's The Hamlet. Each voice has its idiosyncrasies and slightly different ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
5
Section 3
21
Section 4
43
Section 5
54
Section 6
80
Section 7
89
Section 8
96
Section 13
158
Section 14
183
Section 15
195
Section 16
221
Section 17
255
Section 18
267
Section 19
271
Section 20
274

Section 9
114
Section 10
118
Section 11
137
Section 12
147
Section 21
295
Section 22
313
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Louise Erdrich lives with her family in Minnesota and is the owner of Birchbark Books, an independent bookstore. Ms. Erdrich is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, and this story—which will, in the end, span one hundred years in the life of an Ojibwe woman—was inspired when Ms. Erdrich and her mother, Rita Gourneau Erdrich, were researching their own family history. Chickadee begins a new part of the story that started with The Birchbark House, a National Book Award finalist; The Game of Silence, winner of the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction; and the acclaimed The Porcupine Year.

Ms. Erdrich is also the bestselling author of many critically acclaimed novels for adults, including the Pulitzer Prize finalist The Plague of Doves and National Book Award finalist The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse. She is also the author of the picture book Grandmother's Pigeon, illustrated by Jim LaMarche.

Bibliographic information